School of Education & Child Development

Four of five finalists for SPS Teacher of the Year are Drury graduates

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., April 17, 2017 — Drury University’s commitment to outstanding teacher education will be evident as Springfield Public Schools prepares to name its 2017 Teacher of the Year at a banquet tonight. That’s because four of the five finalists for Teacher of the Year are Drury graduates.

Three of the finalists earned both undergraduate and graduate degrees from Drury, while a fourth earned a graduate degree. The four teachers are:

Betsy Cannella, an art teacher at Glendale High School. Cannella earned a B.Arch. in Architecture from Drury in 2006 and Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction in 2008.

Jenny Talburt, a fourth grade teacher at Pershing Elementary School. Talburt earned a B.A. in Elementary Education from Drury in 2001 and Master of Education in Special Reading in 2008.

Gretchen Teague, a communication arts teacher at Central High School. Teague earned a Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction from Drury in 2006.

Kevin Zimmerman, an art teacher at Harrison Elementary School. Zimmerman earned a B.A. in Fine Arts and Secondary Education from Drury in 2007 and a Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction in 2010.

_w3a9062-editTeague and Cannella remain connected to Drury, as they are currently involved with the longstanding annual summer camps hosted by Drury’s Center for Gifted Education. Talburt is an adjunct instructor at Drury.

“We are so incredibly proud of what these teachers have accomplished in the classroom this year, and throughout their careers,” says Laurie Edmondson, dean of Drury’s School of Education and Child Development. “It’s a testament to Drury to see the kind of impact they are making in the lives of the students. This is exactly why we do what we do each day.”

Vocal music teacher Daniel Gutierrez is the fifth finalist. The finalists were selected from a pool of 77 nominations, according to SPS, and the winner will be eligible to compete at the regional level. Nominated teachers submit an essay describing their philosophy of teaching, which a selection committee uses to choose candidates to participate in face-to-face interviews with the committee. To be eligible, a teacher must have worked for at least four years as a teacher at SPS.

The annual awards banquet is hosted by the Foundation for Springfield Public Schools.

For more information about undergraduate and graduate education programs at Drury, visit: www.drury.edu/education.

UPDATE: Congratulations to Daniel Gutierrez on taking home Teacher of the Year honors.

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Drury hosts recognition ceremony for promising Missouri scholars Friday

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 19, 2016 — The Drury Center for Gifted Education, in partnership with the Duke University Talent Identification Program (TIP), will honor more than 400 of Missouri’s most promising young scholars at a recognition ceremony at 11 a.m., Friday, May 20 in the O’Reilly Family Event Center. Central High School student and former Duke TIP honoree Amanda Morrison will be the keynote speaker.

To qualify for recognition, seventh-grade honorees must take the ACT or SAT and score at a level equal to or better than 50 percent of the high school juniors and seniors who took the test. Duke TIP, a nonprofit organization, has conducted an annual search for academically talented youth in the state of Missouri as well as 15 other states since its founding in 1980.

Drury University has hosted the annual statewide recognition event since 1981. Representatives from Drury, Duke TIP and Springfield Public Schools’ gifted education program will be available for comment to the media before or after the ceremony.

Drury has been a national leader in providing education and enrichment programs for academically gifted students more than 30 years. The Drury Center for Gifted Education is the most complete center for gifted education in the state of Missouri, and is one of less than 20 complete gifted education centers in the United States. Each summer, more than 700 children from pre-K through high school attend Drury’s educational camps for gifted students. Visit Drury Gifted Education for more information.

The Center is part of Drury’s School of Education and Child Development, which is the longest continually accredited School of Education in the state of Missouri. Drury undergraduate and graduate programs in education have a decades-long record of adding value to the lives of children and youth by preparing highly effective teachers and leaders for work in schools throughout the Ozarks region and beyond.

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Media Contact: Mary Potthoff, Director of the Center for Gifted Education – (417) 873-7386; (417) 885-8089 or mpotthof@drury.edu.

Three of the year’s top five SPS teachers are Drury graduates

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., April 27, 2016 — The Foundation for Springfield Public Schools held its Annual Teacher Appreciation Banquet on April 18, where it named the system’s Teacher of the Year. Of the five finalists for the award, three are Drury University alumni.

Loren Broaddus, a social studies teacher at Kickapoo High School, earned his Bachelor of Arts from Drury in 1988, and his MED in 1994.

Mary “Betsy” Cannella, a Project Lead The Way teacher at Glendale High School, earned a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Drury in 2006, and a Master of Education degree from Drury in 2008.

Angela Odom, a math teacher at Kickapoo High School, earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Drury in 1992.

“It’s wonderful to see that our graduates are not only making a difference in classrooms, but are also being recognized as among the best in the field,” said Dr. Laurie Edmondson, Dean of the College of Education and Child Development. “And it’s always nice when that recognition happens right here in our own back yard.”

The Drury University School of Education and Child Development offers the longest standing accredited teacher preparation program in Missouri. For more information on education degrees at Drury, go to www.drury.edu/education.

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Two of Missouri’s best new teachers trained at Drury

Two of Missouri’s best new teachers received their professional training from Drury’s College of Continuing Professional Studies.

Callie Beard, an elementary school teacher in the Lebanon school district, and Fernando Sustaita, a middle school teacher at Nixa, were recently given the Outstanding Beginning Teacher Award by the Missouri Association for Colleges of Teacher Education.

The recipients were selected based on evaluations of outstanding graduates completed by their college or university, and recommendations from the school districts where they teach.

Callie Beard teaches elementary school students in her Lebanon classroom.

Callie Beard teaches elementary school students in her Lebanon classroom.

“I was stunned, shocked and elated,” says Beard, who teaches social studies and communication arts to fifth graders.

After spending her first two years at another school, Beard switched gears seeking more financial flexibility and classes closer to her hometown of Lebanon. She took classes through Drury’s Springfield, St. Robert and Lebanon campuses. Many of her instructors were teachers in the immediate area.

“They could draw from their own personal experience,” Beard says. “They had classroom examples ready; they were familiar faces.”

Sustaita knows about switching gears, too. After 15 years in the business world, he decided to make a career change and become a teacher. Now in his second year at a seventh grade history teacher in Nixa, he also coaches three sports (cross country, basketball and track), drives busses for the teams, serves on school committees.

“When I want to do something, I go in 110 percent,” he says. “I don’t hold back.”

Fernando Sustaita teaches history at Nixa, and also coaches cross country, basketball and track.

Fernando Sustaita teaches history at Nixa, and also coaches cross country, basketball and track.

Seeing students succeed drives him, Sustaita says. And that’s the same kind of treatment he received from his professors when he was a student earning a Master of Education at Drury, he says. In fact, he still reaches out to them for advice and mentorship, even after graduation.

“I trust the education system there,” he says. “I trusted my advisors. And I know that wherever I’m going to go, people are going to look at that degree and hold it to a high standard.”

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Story by Mike Brothers, Drury’s director of media relations.

Drury, SPS partner to offer Developing Success in Youth conference for educators

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Nov. 7, 2014 — Drury University will partner with Springfield Public Schools this Tuesday, November 11, to present the 14th annual Developing Success in Youth conference on the DU campus.

This year’s keynote speaker is Jay McTighe, a national presenter and published author on increasing understanding and retention in the classroom. McTighe, who is known for authoring the book “Understanding by Design,” will address the difference between educational standards and district curricula, emphasizing the role of the teacher in connecting the two.

In addition, Drury faculty will conduct afternoon breakout sessions on topics ranging from the Common Core State Standards to the use of Virtual Reality in the classroom.

The material will be relevant to all K-12 educators and administrators. The full cost is $150. A discounted rate of $125 per individual is offered for groups of five or more from a given school, and university students are welcome at $25.

More than one hundred educators from across Missouri have already registered to attend. Information on the conference and online registration can be found at www.drury.edu/dsy, or by contacting Dr. Kristofor Wiley, assistant professor of education, at (417) 873-6397 or kwiley002@drury.edu.

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