humanities

Drury’s humanities film series returns to The Moxie on Saturday for spring run

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., March 21, 2017 — Drury University’s Humanities & Ethics Center has again partnered with the Moxie Cinema in downtown Springfield to host a series of screenings and open discussions at the local independent theater. The fifth season continues with three more films this spring following a winter break. The Drury Humanities & Arts Film Series is made possible by a grant from the Missouri Humanities Council.

The partnership between Drury and the nonprofit Moxie Cinema places a spotlight on films that ask enduring questions about the human condition and adds an open, facilitated discussion to the mix. After each showing, a Drury professor leads a group discussion about the movie’s themes. The post-film discussions are about 30 minutes each. Tickets are $5 and all screenings begin at 1 p.m.

Richard Schur

Richard Schur

The film series returns at 1 p.m. this Saturday, March 25 with a talk from Dr. Rich Schur following a screening of the Academy Award-winning 1997 Italian film “Life is Beautiful.” The film is a comedy and set during the Holocaust and tells the story of a Jewish librarian who uses fantasy and humor to shield his son from the grim reality of the death camps. It raises significant questions about the nature of comedy, as some critics argued that the film sanitized the Holocaust, misrepresenting the horror of the events. Others defended the film and believed it told a powerful story with humane values. In the post-film discussion, Dr. Schur, professor of English, will revisit this controversy and explore whether there are some limits comedy should not and cannot cross.

The remaining films in the series include:

April 1 – “The Sea Inside” with Dr. Chris Panza, professor of philosophy

April 22 ­– “Son of Man” with Dr. Teresa Hornsby, professor of religion

In addition to the Humanities and Arts Film Series, Dr. Shannon McMurtrey will bring his expertise in cybersecurity to a discussion of privacy and intelligence gathering following a screening of the 1974 classic “The Conversation” on Tuesday, April 18 as a part of The Moxie’s Science on Screen series.

For more information, go to http://www.moxiecinema.com.

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Events explore lessons from WWII-era Japanese-American internment camps

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., January 31, 2017 — A multi-disciplinary series of events and performances at Drury University will tell the story of the internment camps set up by the U.S. government to hold Japanese-Americans during World War II. The camps were result of President Franklin Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066 signed in the weeks after the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.

Chikaraishi

Chikaraishi

“Life Interrupted: Art for Social Change” is a project that brings together the arts, humanities, history and political science departments at Drury, along with the greater Springfield community and the CORE Performance Company, to hear about the camps and ask what we can learn from the experience.

How have these same issues of civil rights violations, racial profiling, discrimination, immigration and xenophobia shifted, changed, or stayed the same? How do we ensure the safety of our country without discriminating against ethnic and religious minorities?

“It’s 75 years past and we’re still grappling with the same issues – fear of people we don’t know, fear of people who look different from us,” says Nancy Chikaraishi, a Drury architecture professor whose parents and grandparents were forced into the camps, and who is the lead organizer for the series of “Life Interrupted” events at Drury.

MORE: Read an interview with Chikaraishi about her personal connection to the internment camps and how she became involved in the “Life Interrupted” project.

The events begin on Thursday with a roundtable discussion with community leaders, followed by a dance workshop and art installation on Friday and a performance on Saturday of “Life Interrupted” by CORE, which is based in Atlanta and Houston. A final panel discussion on the nature of architecture and power will be held next week.

Full list of events:

Thursday, Feb. 2, 6 p.m. – Roundtable discussion with local community leaders led by Drury political science professors Dr. Daniel Ponder and Dr. Jeff Vandenberg, with representatives from the Islamic Society of Joplin, NAACP, Temple Israel, and PROMO. Location: Reed Auditorium, Trustee Science Center on the Drury campus.

Friday Feb. 3, 3-4:30 p.m. – Dance workshop and story circle with the CORE Performance Company. Participants will be guided through the story circle process, sharing personal stories related to the themes investigated in “Life Interrupted.” No previous dance experience is required. Participants are encouraged to wear clothing that will not inhibit moving freely. Location: Drury on C-Street Gallery, 233 E. Commercial Street.

Friday, Feb. 3, 5-8 p.m. – Interactive art installation & exhibition opening led by Nancy Chikaraishi and Drury students (following the dance workshop and story circle). Location: Drury on C-Street Gallery, 233 E. Commercial Street.

Saturday, Feb. 4, 7:30 p.m. – “Life Interrupted” dance theatrical performance by the CORE Performance Company. Reserve tickets for free online. Location: Wilhoit Theater, Breech School of Business, corner of Central Street and Drury Lane.

Tuesday, Feb. 7, 6-7:30 p.m. – Panel Discussion on Architecture & Power, led by Drury architecture professors Dr. Robert Weddle, Dr. Panos Leventis and Nancy Chikaraishi. Location: Drury on C-Street Gallery, 233 E. Commercial Street.

This project is supported in part by awards from the Mid-America Arts Alliance, National Endowment for the Arts, Missouri Arts Council, and foundations, corporations and individuals throughout Arkansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Texas, Springfield Regional Arts Council and Community Foundation of the Ozarks, DoubleTree by Hilton, Nelson and Kelley Still Nichols, Colorgraphic Printing, Drury University, Drury University’s Hammons School of Architecture and the L.E. Meador Center for Politics and Citizenship.

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Media Contact: Nancy Chikaraishi, Professor of Architecture: (417) 873-7459 or nchikaraishi@drury.edu.

Drury’s humanities film series returns to Moxie Cinema for fifth season

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Oct. 12, 2016 — Drury University’s Humanities & Ethics Center has again partnered with the Moxie Cinema in downtown Springfield to host a series of screenings and open discussions at the local independent theater. The Drury Humanities & Arts Film Series is made possible by a grant from the Missouri Humanities Council.

The film series returns at 1 p.m. this Saturday, Oct. 15 with a talk from Dr. Kevin Henderson following a screening of landmark British film “The Third Man.” The partnership between Drury and the nonprofit Moxie Cinema places a spotlight on films that ask enduring questions about the human condition and adds an open, facilitated discussion to the mix. After each showing, a Drury professor leads a group discussion about the movie’s themes. The post-film discussions are about 30 minutes each. Tickets are $5 and all screenings begin at 1 p.m.

“Our series continues to offer an eclectic mix of powerful films,” explains Dr. Kevin Henderson, director of the series and Assistant Dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. “We screen movies that audiences enjoy weighing in on and may not have other opportunities to see in theaters.”

Oct. 15 – “The Third Man” with Dr. Kevin Henderson, assistant professor of English

Nov. 5 – “The Passion of Joan of Arc” with Dr. Shelley Wolbrink, professor of history

Nov. 19 ­– “Like Water for Chocolate” with Dr. Elizabeth Nichols, professor of Spanish

March 25 – “Life is Beautiful” with Dr. Richard Schur, professor of English

April 1 ­– “Son of Man” with Dr. Teresa Hornsby, professor of religion

April 22 – “The Sea Inside” with Dr. Chris Panza, professor of philosophy

For more information, go to http://www.moxiecinema.com.

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Media Contact: Kevin Henderson – Director, Humanities and Arts Film Series: (417) 873-7426 or khenders@drury.edu.

Week of public events celebrates the Arts, Humanities, & Social Sciences

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., April 18, 2016 — Drury University’s College of Humanities & Social Sciences will host a week’s worth of events, lectures, student presentations and performances during the inaugural CHSS Week, which begins today.

CHSS Week is a celebration highlighting the ways in which the study of areas such as fine and performing arts, social sciences and the humanities contribute to knowledge of the human experience and prepare students for successful careers and fulfilling lives. Students in these fields cultivate sharp critical thinking skills, the courage to take intellectual risks, open-mindedness, and creativity.

“During the last few years, the faculty and students in these areas have been working hard to tell the story of the arts, the humanities, and the social sciences in a time when some are shortsightedly questioning the value of these critical fields,” says Chris Panza, dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. “All of these departments were brought under a single umbrella as a College last fall, and we began to plan an event around expressing the enduring value of our common work.”

All events are open to the public. A complete listing can be found online. Highlights include:

Monday, April 18, 8:30 a.m. to 3p.m. – International Culture Fair. Over 500 children from surrounding Springfield schools will attend. Findlay Student Center Ballroom.

Tuesday, April 19, 3 – 4:30 p.m. – The Making of “Van Halen Rising.” Dr. Greg Renoff will discuss how he turned his fandom and research into the book. Reed Auditorium, Trustee Science Center.

Wednesday, April 20, 5 p.m. – “Why Tolerate Religion?” Lecture by University of Chicago law professor Brian Leiter, a leading scholar in the areas of law and philosophy. Diversity Center.

Wednesday, April 20, 12 – 8 p.m.  English and Writing Symposium. Alumni and area professionals will hold a panel discussion, Shakespeare and Ethics performance, student readings, followed by reading by Cole Closser. Harwood Reading Room, Olin Library.

Thursday, April 21, 7:30 p.m. – Jazz concert. Clara Thompson Hall.

Friday, April 22, 7:30 p.m. – Drury Theatre Presents: “The Three Sisters,” 7:30 p.m., Wilhoit Theatre. (NOTE: Performances of “The Three Sisters” take place on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday.)

Saturday, 7:30 p.m. – Finale Concert by the Springfield-Drury Civic Orchestra. Evangel University Chapel Auditorium.

For more about the Humanities and Social Sciences at Drury, visit the CHSS page at Drury.edu or read the Human, All Too Human blog.

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Media Contact: Dr. Chris Panza, Dean, College of Humanities & Social Sciences: (417) 873-6873 or cpanza@drury.edu.

Humanities & Arts Film Series returns to the Moxie Cinema in April 

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., March 29, 2016 — Drury University’s Humanities & Ethics Center continues its partnership with the Moxie Cinema in downtown Springfield with three upcoming screenings. Drury professors will host the screenings and lead discussions about the films. The Drury Humanities & Arts Film Series is made possible by a grant from the Missouri Humanities Council.

The spring series begins on Saturday, April 2 at 1 p.m. with the film, Chinatown. Dr. Kevin Henderson, assistant dean of the humanities and social sciences, will host the screening by giving a short talk and leading a discussion with the audience. The themes will include the film’s now iconic status, the questions it poses for the humanities, and the lingering power of film noir in American culture. Thanks to the grant from the Missouri Humanities Council, tickets are half-price ($5).

Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway star in Chinatown.

Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway star in Chinatown.

Next in the series is the film The Iron Giant, hosted by Steve Carpenter, assistant professor of art/communication, which will screen on Saturday, April 16 at 1 p.m. Tickets will be free for this showing.

The third and final film is Burnt By the Sun, hosted by Dr. Ray Patton, assistant professor of history. This film will screen on Saturday, April 30 at 1 p.m. Tickets for this event will be half-price ($5).

The Moxie is the region’s only independently owned arts cinema and is located at 305 S. Campbell Ave. Parking in the adjacent parking garage is free of charge.

For more information about these films or this series, which is part of Drury’s Humanities and Ethics Center series, visit Drury’s Humanities blog Human, All Too Human, or www.moxiecinema.com.

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Media Contact: Kevin Henderson; Director, Humanities and Arts Film Series: (417) 873-7426 or khenders@drury.edu.

Drury’s humanities film series returns to Moxie Cinema for fourth season

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Oct. 19, 2015 — Drury University’s Humanities & Ethics Center has again partnered with the Moxie Cinema in downtown Springfield to host a series of screenings and open discussions at the local independent theater. The Drury Humanities & Arts Film Series is made possible by a grant from the Missouri Humanities Council.

The film series returns at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 24 with a talk from Dr. Heidi Backes following a screening of Guillermo del Toro’s “Pan’s Labyrinth.” The partnership between Drury and the nonprofit Moxie Cinema places a spotlight on films that ask enduring questions about the human condition and adds an open, facilitated discussion to the mix. Before and after each showing, a Drury professor leads a group discussion about the movie’s themes. The post-film discussions are about 30 minutes each. Tickets are $5 and all screenings begin at 1 p.m.

Charlie Chaplin in the 1936 film "Modern Times"

Charlie Chaplin in the 1936 film “Modern Times”

“Although our series still features an eclectic mix of movies, each film connects to our 2015-16 Drury Humanities theme of power,” explains Dr. Kevin Henderson, director of the series and Assistant Dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. “From machinery devouring Charlie Chaplin in ‘Modern Times’ to South African teens discovering the power of empathy in ‘Tsotsi’ to Jack Nicholson uncovering the corruption of municipal powers in ‘Chinatown,’ these films offer us many ways to discuss what being powerful or powerless does to our humanity.”

2015-15 Schedule

Oct. 24 – “Pan’s Labyrinth” with Dr. Heidi Backes, assistant professor of Spanish

Nov. 7 – “Modern Times” with Dr. Chris Panza, professor of philosophy

Nov. 21 ­– “Tsotsi” with Dr. Erin Kenny, associate professor of anthropology

April 2 – “Chinatown” with Dr. Kevin Henderson, assistant professor of English

April 16 ­– “The Iron Giant” with Steve Carpenter, assistant professor of art/communication

April 23 – “Burnt by the Sun” with Dr. Ray Patton, assistant professor of history

For more information, go to Drury’s Humanities blog Human, All Too Human or www.moxiecinema.com.

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Media Contact: Kevin Henderson – Director, Humanities and Arts Film Series. Office: (417) 873-7426; email: khenders@drury.edu.

Philosophy student earns spot in selective summer program for women

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 11, 2015 — Drury University sophomore Cassie Atchley has been selected to take part in the Summer Program for Women in Philosophy at the University of California San Diego. The program is highly competitive – only 16 students were chosen from a pool of hundreds of applications from across the United States and Canada this year.

The two-week program will be held at UCSD from July 26 to August 8, and will feature two intensive courses and a variety of workshops, all geared towards providing an engaging philosophical learning experience and preparation for applying to graduate school in philosophy. Participants will receive a $600 stipend and all costs for transportation, housing, meals, and workshop materials are covered.

Cassie Atchley

Cassie Atchley

“I am grateful, and beyond excited, to have been selected to participate in UCSD’s Women in Philosophy program. I know that this opportunity will provide me with an invaluable experience, one that will be beneficial to me both as a philosopher and as a woman in academia,” says Atchley, who is majoring in both philosophy and writing. “I hope to improve my philosophical abilities and gain insight into what life in graduate school is like in order to be better prepared for my future endeavors. I am also looking forward to being surrounded by other women who possess a similar passion for philosophy.”

Following graduation in 2016, Atchley, who is from Springfield, plans to attend graduate school. Her primary interest is in analytic philosophy, but she plans to apply to universities that have law schools and philosophy programs in order to work towards both a law degree and Ph.D in philosophy.

“I hope one day to teach philosophy at a small university similar to Drury,” she says.

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Moroccan professor teaches Arabic at Drury thanks to Fulbright program

For 10 years, Jalal Ismaili taught English to students in his home country, Morocco. This year, as part of the prestigious Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistantship program, he is teaching Arabic to American students at Drury, creating an important cultural exchange that emphasizes Drury’s global studies mission.

Ismaili teaches elementary and advanced Arabic courses as part of Drury’s Middle East Studies minor. Arabic is the official language of Morocco and 21 other countries in Africa and Asia.

Jalal Ismaili

Jalal Ismaili

The Fulbright program is funded by the U.S. State Department and managed by the International Institute of Education. It involves a rigorous, competitive application process, and provides opportunities for students, professors and scholars from the United States to teach and study abroad, and vice versa. Six current Drury professors and even some former students have been granted Fulbright awards to study and teach in their fields overseas.

For nine years, Drury has also hosted an Arabic Foreign Language Teaching Assistant through the program.

“One of the great benefits for Drury is that we get the opportunity for people to come from the Middle East and teach an important and challenging language,” says Dr. Jeff VanDenBerg, professor of political science and director of the Middle East Studies program. “More significantly, we get a view of the Arab world in a human way — a cultural exchange and understanding that’s not just through news headlines.”

Ismaili spoke with the previous Fulbright FLTA scholar who came to Drury last year and consequentially had high expectations about what he would experience when he came to Springfield.

“He told me that the people here were very kind and welcoming and I can see that throughout the campus,” Ismaili said. “I’ve taught about American culture, but I haven’t gotten to actually live it, so this opportunity has really helped me in my career and given me a better, cultural understanding.”

Ismaili holds an M.A. in multilingual translation and is currently working on his Ph.D. in English. During his time at Drury, he hopes to act as an ambassador for his country. He teaches Arab culture, history and customs in his language courses, and has guest-lectured in other professors’ classes.

“I think many students have misconceptions about the Arab world just as I have had misconceptions about Americans,” says Ismaili. “People tend to overgeneralize on both sides. Changing those views is one of my priorities. I don’t just want to tell others about the culture, I want to bring them into it and into the environment.”

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Story by Kaleigh Jurgensmeyer, English and writing major at Drury. A version of this story first appeared in the Springfield News-Leader.

 

Humanities & Ethics Center presents #humgoespop this fall

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Sept. 19, 2014 — Drury University’s Humanities & Ethics Center has announced its fall calendar of events, including a book series, a film series in conjunction with the Moxie Cinema, and a speaker series. All activities are open to the public.

The theme for the upcoming year is #humgoespop or “Humanities Goes Pop,” which seeks to highlight how popular culture explores the study of human culture.

Now in its second year, the Humanities & Ethics Center hopes to engage students and local residents by promoting open discussions about various humanistic ideas and values. The Center’s innovative outreach efforts are in part a response to misperceptions about the field in light of a national focus on science, technology and business education during tough economic times. Discussions about values and ethics in many ways become even more essential during such times, say faculty.

“The Humanities are not mere ‘ivory tower’ issues, but the central questions of morality, memory, existence and character that ordinary people grapple with every day,” says Dr. Richard Schur, professor of English at Drury. “Attending the Center’s events makes humanities inquiry come alive and helps us understand how historical, religious, philosophical, and literary debates affect us in our everyday lives.”

“Humanities Goes Pop” Fall 2014 event calendar

Sept. 23, noon – Book Discussion Series – Harwood Reading Room, Olin Library

“Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead” by Burt Royal

Oct. 1, 7:30 p.m. – Humanities Night at the Theatre – Wilhoit Theater

“Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead”

Discussion of the play led by Dr. Peter Meidlinger (English) and Madison Spencer (Theater)

Oct. 25, 1 p.m. – Moxie Film Series – Moxie Cinema

“On The Waterfront”

Dr. Kevin Henderson (English) will lead a discussion following the film

Oct. 28, noon – Book Discussion Series – Harwood Reading Room, Olin Library

“Pride and Prejudice and Zombies” by Seth Grahame-Smith and Jane Austen

Nov. 6, 11 a.m. – Thinking Aloud Series – Olin Room, Olin Library

Dr. Patrick Moser, “Research in the Classroom”

Nov. 8, 1 p.m. – Moxie Film Series – Moxie Cinema

“The Spirit of the Beehive”

Dr. Heidi Backes (Spanish) will lead a discussion following the film.

Nov. 15, 1 p.m. – Moxie Film Series – Moxie Cinema

“Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb”

Dr. Peter Meidlinger (English) and Jess Heugel will lead a discussion following the film

Academic programs under Drury’s humanities division include communication, English, history, languages, library science and philosophy & religion. For more information about the Humanities at Drury or upcoming events, visit the division’s web page, read the “Human, All Too Human” blog, or follow on Twitter and Facebook.

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Drury’s Humanities Film Series at the Moxie Resumes on Saturday

The Moxie Film Series presented by the Drury University Humanities & Ethics Center will resume Saturday afternoon with a showing of Vittorio De Sica’s influential and thought-provoking “Bicycle Thieves.” The series is made possible with the help of a grant from the Missouri Arts Council. The screens are open to the public. The cost is $7, the regular matinee ticket price.

The partnership between Drury and the nonprofit Moxie Cinema put films that ask enduring questions about the human condition in the spotlight – and adds an open, facilitated discussion to the mix. Before and after each showing, a Drury professor leads a group discussion about the movie’s themes. The pre- and post-film discussions are about 30 minutes each.

“Bicycle Thieves,” released in 1948, is regarded by critics as one of the most influential films of all time, and has won praise from sources as diverse as Entertainment Weekly and the Vatican. Sight & Sound magazine rates it as one of the top ten films ever made, and it is near the top of the British Film Institute’s list of movies young people should see by age 14.

The pre-show discussion for “Bicycle Thieves” begins at 1 p.m., Saturday, March 29, at the Moxie Cinema, 305 S. Campbell Ave. The film is about 90 minutes long. Dr. Kevin Henderson, assistant professor of English, will lead the discussions.

The 1 p.m. start time remains the same for the final two movies in the series as well:

Saturday, April 5 – “Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter … and Spring” (2003), directed by Ki-Duk Kim. Dr. Hue-Ping Chin, professor of history, will lead the discussions.

Saturday, April 12 – “Good Hair” (2009), produced by Chris Rock. Dr. Elizabeth Nichols, professor of Spanish, will lead the discussions.

For more information about the series and featured films, visit the series web page.

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