Hammons School of Architecture

Film shows impact of Joplin tornado healing garden created by DU students

Media Contact: Traci Sooter – Professor of Architecture; Director of Design-Build Programs: (417) 234-6405

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 22, 2017 — Since opening three years ago, the Landscapes of Resilience Butterfly Garden & Overlook in Joplin has helped the residents of a tornado-ravaged community experience healing and recovery through nature and thoughtful design.

Today, on the sixth anniversary of the Joplin tornado, a short documentary film telling the story of this project – designed by the Drury University Hammons School of Architecture’s Design-Build Program – is being released.

The seven-minute film, titled “Butterfly Angels,” shines a light on an effort that drew together an eclectic and passionate team of people, many from Joplin and the surrounding area; others from a thousand miles away. Together, they focused on conceptualizing and creating a green space, a healing garden, for the purpose of helping the people of Joplin deal with the enormous trauma inflicted by the tornado.

The film will be available for viewing starting Monday at: http://www.natureeffect.org/Joplin. It will also be featured by AccuWeather on television and online.

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“The devastation that Joplin experienced was beyond what most of us can fully imagine,” said Alden Stoner, the producer and co-director behind “Butterfly Angels.” “When we think of disaster recovery, most of us envision the rebuilding process — the reconstruction of homes, businesses — but in truth, it’s about something much deeper.”

Among the voices heard in the film are those of Drury architecture professors and co-lead project designers Traci Sooter and Nancy Chikaraishi; and Chris Cotten, head of Joplin’s Parks and Recreation Department and a Drury alumnus. Others include former mayor Melodee Colbert-Kean and Cornell University’s Keith Tidball, who has long studied how nature can be a source of resilience for communities.

The Garden & Overlook project showcases a unique aspect of the Hammons School’s Design-Build Program: a “whole school” approach that pulls in students and faculty members from across Drury’s liberal arts spectrum. English students collected and transcribed survivor stories, which inspired design students prior to the build, and were eventually quoted on the storyboards in the garden. Psychology faculty has studied the healing aspects of the garden for Joplin residents. More than 60 students, staff and faculty converged on the site to install some features. Music Therapy students played music to motivate, uplift, and rejuvenate volunteers.

“Butterfly Angels” was produced by Stoneworth Studios, in partnership with the TKF Foundation, a nonprofit devoted to enabling more opportunities for people to experience the healing and restorative benefits of nature. The Foundation, through its Nature Sacred Award program, was a major funder of the Garden, which is also serving as a research site for Tidball and a team of fellow researchers from Drury University and the USDA National Forest Service. The team is seeking to learn more about the benefits of specific aspects of these types of green spaces.

Learn more about the Butterfly Garden & Overlook at: http://www.drury.edu/butterfly-garden.

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Professor Emeritus Michael Buono elected to AIA College of Fellows

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 24, 2016 — Drury University professor emeritus Michael Buono has been selected by the American Institute of Architects to its prestigious College of Fellows. Buono, who retired in 2015, was formally inducted last week during the AIA national meeting in Philadelphia.

The College of Fellows, founded in 1952, is composed of members of the Institute who are elected to Fellowship by a jury of their peers. Fellowship is one of the highest honors the AIA can bestow upon a member. This honor not only recognizes the achievements of the architect as an individual, but also elevates before the public and the profession those who have made significant contributions to architecture and to society.

Michael Buono

Michael Buono

“The American Institute of Architects has over 85,000 members, and each year only around 150 AIA members are elected to the Institute’s College of Fellows,” says Dr. Robert Weddle, dean of the Hammons School of Architecture. “This news truly demonstrates Professor Buono’s caliber and dedication as an educator and is emblematic of the quality of the HSA program, which he led for over a decade.”

Buono is only the third AIA member from the southwest Missouri area to be elected an AIA Fellow. The first was Richard P. Stahl, a 1936 Drury graduate and architect of many distinguished buildings, including on the Drury campus. HSA alumnus Andrew Wells ’91 — principal of Dake Wells Architecture in Springfield — was the second.

Buono, AIA, LEED AP, served as Director of the Hammons School of Architecture from 2000 until 2012. Prior to joining Drury, he served as associate dean and also director of the architecture program at the University of Arkansas for 15 years. He has also taught at Texas Tech University, the Georgia Institute of Technology and Mississippi State University. Buono has practiced architecture with firms in Atlanta and Denver, and maintains his own practice. His primary interest is in sustainable design.

For more information about the AIA College of Fellows visit: http://network.aia.org/cof/home.

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Architecture students to present visions for the future of C-Street site

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 5, 2016 — The Hammons School of Architecture’s Center for Community Studies (CCS) has spent the past four months working with community partners to envision concepts for the long-term redevelopment of The Kitchen, Inc. campus on Commercial Street.

The fourth and final public forum in this process will take place from 7 to 9 p.m., Tuesday, May 10 at the Savoy Ballroom, 224 E. Commercial St. Students and faculty from the CCS will present and discuss potential visions for the 3.5-acre site. Media are invited to attend.

The CCS has worked in collaboration with The Kitchen Inc., Commercial Club, C-Street CID, Landmarks Board, University of Missouri-Extension, City of Springfield Planning and Development, and citizens of Springfield throughout the process.

The intent of this collaborative endeavor was not to identify or choose a specific redevelopment plan for the site. Instead, the process was a way to explore issues associated with the redevelopment of the properties, explore the viability of the various approaches, and invigorate the public discussion of the potential of the properties and surrounding Commercial Street context. Additionally, it serves as a way to document the findings in a graphic and written manner that may be used by the future redevelopment partnership.

The Kitchen is in the process of moving out of its facilities located at the Commercial Street campus and decentralizing its operations throughout the Springfield community. The campus on Commercial Street contains many diverse structures that are important to the physical integrity of the streetscape of Commercial Street, to the historical context of north Springfield, and anchor the important Benton/Commercial intersection at the east gateway to the Commercial Street district. The redevelopment of this large complex is of great importance to The Kitchen Inc., City of Springfield, Commercial Club, C-Street CID, Landmarks Board, and residents of Midtown, Commercial Street, and Woodland Heights neighborhoods.

About the Center for Community Studies

The Center for Community Studies is the interdisciplinary research and academic outreach component of the Hammons School of Architecture. The mission of the center is to assist the regional community in exploring and promoting innovative planning, design and development practices that respond to the challenges of our contemporary and future society and foster a healthier and sustainable habitat for our global community. The Center has worked with more than 60 communities across the region over the last 15 years. Visioning projects inside the City of Springfield have included the West Central Neighborhood Route 66 corridor and a center city housing study.

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Media Contact: Jay Garrott, Professor of Architecture and Director of the Center for Community Studies: (417) 873-7371 or jgarrott@drury.edu

Crowder-Drury team finishes 8th overall in Solar Decathlon competition

The Crowder-Drury team finished in 8th place overall in the 2015 Solar Decathlon, the U.S. Department of Energy announced today in Irvine, California. The team’s ShelteR3 (pronounced “Shelter Cubed”) home was more than 18 months in the making. The highly interdisciplinary project brought Crowder and Drury students to the national stage to showcase their expertise in architecture, engineering, marketing, communication and design. About 140 teams applied for entry into the competition – 20 were accepted and 14 actually made it to the competition itself.

“We are extremely proud of what this team has accomplished here over the last year and a half,” said Dr. Robert Weddle, dean of the Hammons School of Architecture at Drury. “The atmosphere surrounding this competition here in Irvine has been a once-in-a-lifetime experience for our students. The opportunity to design and build this home from concept to competition has been an invaluable learning process for each of them.”

Drury student Michaela Cantrell plugs in a Nissan Leaf after the electric car was driven 25 miles for a competition during the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon in Irvine, California on Friday, Oct. 9. (Credit: Thomas Kelsey/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)

Drury student Michaela Cantrell plugs in a Nissan Leaf after the electric car was driven 25 miles for a competition during the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon in Irvine, California on Friday, Oct. 9. (Credit: Thomas Kelsey/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)

The team will disassemble the house in the coming days. Following transport back to the Ozarks, the house will find a permanent place in Joplin, the community that inspired its unique design.

Follow, connect with and congratulate the team:

Visitors line up to tour the Crowder College and Drury University house during the  Decathlon. (Credit: Thomas Kelsey/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)

Visitors line up to tour the Crowder College and Drury University house during the Decathlon. (Credit: Thomas Kelsey/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)

About the Solar Decathlon

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Decathlon pits future architects, engineers, marketers and business people from the nation’s top colleges against one another, challenging them to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient and attractive. The winner of the competition will be the team that best blends affordability, consumer appeal, and design excellence with optimal energy production and maximum efficiency.

The Crowder-Drury entry accomplishes all this – and more. The ShelteR3 house has a three-prong design philosophy of Respond, Recover and Resist. Inspired by the devastating and deadly 2011 Joplin tornado, the house is transportable so that it can be trucked to disaster areas during emergency response and recovery efforts. It can then be converted in a permanent and stylish living structure that is designed to resist the extreme winds and debris clouds of potential tornadoes. For more on the house, check out this overview video.

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Crowder-Drury team feeling confident as Solar Decathlon begins in California

DecathlonSPRINGFIELD, Mo., Oct. 9, 2015 — The Crowder-Drury Solar Decathlon team has been on the ground in Irvine, California for more than 10 days now, assembling, furnishing and preparing the ShelteR3 (pronounced “Shelter Cubed”) home for a series of 10 contests as part of this international competition sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Today is first full day of the competition and the Crowder-Drury Decathletes are feeling confident about their showing. The student-led team is pumping out numerous updates from the contest online. Local residents and media outlets can track the team’s progress in the following ways:

Here are a few storylines to know so far:

Get social: The Crowder-Drury team is in first place in the social media engagement portion of the contest. Local residents can help by continuing to share, comment, and like the content on the Facebook and Twitter pages linked above. Use these hash tags: #‎SD2015 and #CrowderDrurySol and mention @‎SolarDecathlon. Engagement yields more points than mere likes or re-tweets, so feel free to ask the team questions or offer words of encouragement online.

Helping hands: Instead of going to a reception event on Wednesday night, several Crowder-Drury students helped the team from New York City College of Technology finish its house. “It’s moments like this that show the character of our students and remind us that this is about much more than a competition,” says Drury professor of architecture Traci Sooter.

Emergency plants: After the team realized the plants they’d ordered for the home were a bit … underwhelming, supporters formed a “crisis plant fund” that raised more than $500 in about 24 hours for some stellar plants that will help with ShelteR3’s curb appeal. That’s just the latest fundraising success for a team that has raised more than $458,000 for the project overall through in-kind and cash donations.

Hang loose: The team is having some fun using a Malibu Ken doll as its unofficial on-site mascot. When you’re in a high-pressure environment like the Decathlon, you have to look for ways to keep things loose while remaining highly focused on the work at hand.

In print: ShelteR3 was featured in a story published in the OC Register on Wednesday.

On air: NBC Nightly News interviewed the ShelteR3 team at Crowder College in September as part of a larger package on the Decathlon. The story will air nationally on NBC at a later date as the Decathlon wraps up.

The contests: The first of 10 contests took place Thursday night. In the Home Life Contest, students hosted a dinner party in the house for other teams. Remaining measured contests include: Commuting, Appliances, Comfort Zone and Energy Balance. Juried contests include: Architecture, Market Appeal, Engineering, Communications and Affordability.

The competition: Check out the other teams in the contest.

About the Solar Decathlon

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Decathlon pits future architects, engineers, marketers and business people from the nation’s top colleges against one another, challenging them to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient and attractive. The winner of the competition will be the team that best blends affordability, consumer appeal, and design excellence with optimal energy production and maximum efficiency.

The Crowder-Drury entry accomplishes all this – and more. The ShelteR3 house has a three-part design philosophy of Respond, Recover and Resist. Inspired by the devastating and deadly 2011 Joplin tornado, the house is transportable so that it can be trucked to disaster areas during emergency response and recovery efforts. It can then be converted in a permanent and stylish living structure that is designed to resist the extreme winds and debris clouds of potential tornadoes. For more on the house, check out this overview video.

Drury team awarded 3rd place in 2015 ACSA Design Competition

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., September 22, 2015 — A team comprised of two Drury students, an alumnus and a professor earned 3rd place out of more than 500 entries in an international design contest sponsored by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA).

The 2014-2015 Steel Design Student Competition challenged architecture students to design a library guided by the principles of innovation, creativity, identity, sustainability and functionality. Additionally, design proposals were to take a strong conceptual position about the changing nature of the library as a building type and as a mirror of contemporary culture.

Library exterior view

Library exterior view

Current 5th-year students Junye Zhou and Tony Tai-An Yue and 2014 Drury graduate Nicholas Fish, worked with Visiting Assistant Professor Yong Huang on their library design as an extra-curricular project in addition to their academic and professional obligations. The work, titled “Beacon – Heterotopia of Lagos’ Public Space,” is posted on the ACSA website and will be published in an upcoming book. It will also be exhibited at the ACSA National Convention in Seattle in March and at the American Institute of Architects Annual Convention in Philadelphia in May.

This is the first time Drury has placed in this national contest juried by well-known and award-winning practitioners and educators.

A reading room within the library.

A reading room within the library.

“This is a fantastic accomplishment for this talented team and the committed professor who worked closely with them in a less formal setting than the typical studio or classroom setting,” said Dr. Robert Weddle, dean of the Hammons School of Architecture. “This is the kind of experience fostered by the unique environment of Drury and the HSA where students and faculty know each other well and collaborate on projects they’re passionate about.”

All accredited architecture programs in the United States and Canada are ACSA members, and other affiliated programs bring the number of member schools to more than 250. The ACSA’s student competitions are the largest and most important annual competitions for architecture students.

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Lectures, juried prize cap academic year at Hammons School of Architecture

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 5, 2015 — This week the faculty and students of the Hammons School of Architecture mark the end of another outstanding academic year with special lectures and juries associated with the Librarium Prize. Now in its 15th year, the annual Librarium exhibition and competition recognizes exemplary design work by third-, fourth-, and fifth-year students at HSA.

The slate kicks off at 2:45 p.m. on Thursday with a lecture by HSA alumnus Marcus Farr ’99. Farr is the Director of Farr Projects, based in Boulder, Colorado – a progressive, entrepreneurial research and design studio that operates in the areas of ‪architecture, interior environments, digital fabrications and ‪material research.

At 4 p.m., a public jury will judge the thesis work of six 5th-year architecture students nominated for the Librarium Prize. In addition to Farr, jurors will include Librarium speaker Vincent James of Minneapolis and HSA alumnus Andrew Wells ’91, co-founder of Dake Wells Architecture in Springfield. The thesis project is the product of a year-long investigation of a topic selected by the student, informed by in-depth research in the fall semester, followed by design investigation, development and resolution in the spring.

The students whose work was nominated are Pema Wangzome, Alaa AlRadwan, Mikhail Digman, Juan Zorrilla, Eric Baldwin and Juan Trejo.

James will present a lecture at 1 p.m. on Friday, followed by the announcement of the Librarium Prize winners. James is the Principal of VJAA, a comprehensive studio that encompasses architectural design, environmentally sustainable design, adaptive reuse, historic renovation and preservation, and master planning. VJAA is the recipient of the 2012 American Institute of Architects Firm Award. He is currently Cass Gilbert Professor in Practice at the University of Minnesota School of Architecture.

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Media Contact: Saundra Weddle, Professor of Architecture – (417) 873-7437 or sweddle@drury.edu.

Architecture symposium highlights the role of design in small towns

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., April 6, 2015 — The Hammons School of Architecture will host a symposium titled “Design in the Middle: Making Place in the American Small Town” from 1 to 5 p.m. Friday, April 10 in the HSA Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public.

The symposium will investigate the role of design in shaping public life and giving identity to smaller towns in the American landscape. In such locations, creative and critical architecture challenges the widely held view that design serves merely as aesthetic gloss or a budgetary luxury. Award-winning architects from around the region will present significant projects executed by their firms, which will serve as a starting point for a roundtable discussion.

The speakers include Marlon Blackwell of Marlon Blackwell Architects in Fayetteville, Ark.; Jeffery Day of Min Day in Omaha, Neb., and San Francisco; David Dowell of el dorado in Kansas City; Steve McDowell of BNIM in Kansas City and Drury alumnus Andrew Wells of Dake Wells Architecture in Springfield.

The symposium is part of the HSA 2014-2015 Lecture Series “Locating Design,” which explores the practice of critically engaging physical sites through the act of design.

For more information about the Hammons School of Architecture, visit drury.edu/architecture.

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Media Contact: Dr. Saundra Weddle, Professor of Architecture, “Locating Design” lecture series chair; Office: (417) 873-7437 or email: sweddle@drury.edu.

Co-founder of experimental design firm will speak at Hammons School of Architecture Feb. 27

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Feb. 20, 2015 — The Hammons School of Architecture will host a guest lecture by Lola Sheppard, a co-founder of Lateral Office at 3 p.m., Friday, Feb. 27.

Lateral Office, founded in Toronto in 2003, is an experimental design firm that operates at the intersection of architecture, landscape and urbanism. The studio describes its practice process as a commitment to “design as a research vehicle to pose and respond to complex, urgent questions in the built environment. Its work has been exhibited in numerous venues across the United States, Canada and Europe.

The lecture is part of the HSA 2014-2015 Lecture Series “Locating Design,” which explores the practice of critically engaging physical sites through the act of design.

This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the Hammons School of Architecture, visit drury.edu/architecture.

Media Contact: Jayon You, assistant professor of architecture – (417) 873-7351 or jyou@drury.edu.

 

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Disney internship is “dream come true” for architecture student

Dreams do come true, as fifth-year architecture student Billy Miller proved after completing two internships at “The Happiest Place on Earth.” Miller interned with Disney Imagineering in 2010 and again in 2013.

“I’ve wanted to work for Disney since I was 7 years old,” Miller says.

Disney’s “Imagineers” are responsible for designing and building theme parks, resorts, and other entertainment venues. More than 140 different job titles fall under the banner of Imagineering, according to Disney, including illustrators, architects, engineers, writers, graphic designers and more.

Billy Miller

Drury architecture student Billy Miller

Miller worked with other Imagineers on a variety of projects such as Splash Mountain, as well as buildings, lighting and even animal pens. He also took on a key role on the team designing Disney Springs, a transformation of what is now Downtown Disney inside Walt Disney World into a space modeled after a classic Florida lakeside town.

The experience taught him the importance of collaboration with other disciplines both in and outside of the architectural field and about how to use architecture to tell a story. But he also took a great deal of knowledge with him into the job.

“Drury and the Hammons School of Architecture not only helped foster my design style, but gave me the confidence and knowledge that allowed me to become a leader at Disney,” he says. Miller cites mentors such as professor Jay Garrott and instructor Jeff Barber as specific influences at the beginning of his architectural career.

“I honestly did not realize the breadth of what I had learned until I got down to Disney and saw how many jobs I was able to accomplish that other interns could not,” he says.

Managers within the company gave interns the latitude to lead projects if they showed promise, Miller says. He adds that he was able to take hold of such an opportunity after only three weeks working under another architect.

But the biggest opportunity was simply a chance “to make people happy.”

“There is honestly nothing like seeing someone smile because of something you worked on,” Miller says

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Story by Trevor Cobb, writing major at Drury.