grants

Ferrell-Duncan Clinic, Drury partner to enhance pre-med scholarship programs

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Aug. 24, 2015 — A generous new long-term financial commitment from Ferrell-Duncan Clinic will create three new programs supporting Drury University undergraduates seeking careers in the medical field.

The agreement strengthens the longtime connection between the clinic and the university, furthering both organizations’ mutual goal of enhancing the state of the healthcare industry in southwest Missouri. The deal is a win-win, bolstering Drury’s historically strong pre-med program while adding a valuable physician recruitment channel for the clinic.

The connections between Drury and Ferrell-Duncan run deep: Ferrell-Duncan co-founder Dr. Thomas Ferrell was a Drury alumnus; Dr. Loren Broaddus is a Life Trustee; and 10 Drury alumni currently serve as physicians at the clinic. The clinic is in partnership with CoxHealth, whose CEO Steve Edwards is a Drury alumnus and a current member of the Board of Trustees.

The five-year agreement provides a total of $30,000 annually for the following programs:

Loren Broaddus Medical Service Scholars – This initiative will build upon the Drury Health Services Corps (DHSC), which sends pre-med students to Jordan Valley Health Clinic for a structured volunteer experience. Drury will now expand that program and send students who have been through the first year of the DHSC to other medical facilities following their work at Jordan Valley. This is important because medical and other health professional schools value undergraduate volunteer experiences that focus on direct interactions with individuals seeking healthcare services.

Thomas Ferrell Medical Relief Travel Grants – These grants will provide funding for travel associated with participation in medical relief programs. Such efforts offer valuable opportunities for students to work with medical professionals providing healthcare to underserved populations. Students in these settings acquire professional experience in healthcare while gaining perspective with populations from varied socio-economic backgrounds.

Douglas Duncan Research Experience in the Natural Sciences (RENS) Fellowship – This program will provide summer funding for students in biomedical research under the direction of a member of the natural sciences faculty. Faculty members serve as mentors and advisors, and individual projects support the goals of a research program that is of scientific merit yet is appropriate for undergraduate students.

An additional portion of the agreement will place a practicing physician from Ferrell-Duncan Clinic in a fellowship position in Drury’s Department of Biology. The physician fellow will teach an annual course in clinical medicine, with lecture and clinical rotation experiences through Ferrell-Duncan, to third- and fourth-year pre-health sciences students.

Members of the Ferrell, Duncan and Broaddus families, along with leaders from CoxHealth, Ferrell-Duncan Clinic and Drury, gathered Thursday to celebrate the agreement.

Members of the Ferrell, Duncan and Broaddus families, along with leaders from CoxHealth, Ferrell-Duncan Clinic and Drury, gathered Thursday to celebrate the agreement.

“CoxHealth and Ferrell-Duncan Clinic are honored to establish this scholarship plan with the faculty, staff and students of Drury University,” said Steve Edwards, CEO and President of CoxHealth. “This legacy scholarship is a key component as these three institutions work cooperatively to prepare future healthcare professionals who will one day add their skills and talents to the Springfield area medical community.”

“I am extremely grateful to Ferrell-Duncan Clinic and the CoxHealth Board of Directors for their support of our pre-health sciences programs,” said Drury President Dr. David Manuel. “This agreement elevates a historical relationship into a true partnership. Coming together as community leaders in healthcare education and delivery offers a multi-dimensional opportunity to expand resources and recruitment for both Ferrell-Duncan and Drury.”

About Drury’s Pre-Health Sciences Programs

Drury has an outstanding track record in preparing students for admission into medical and other health-related professional programs. Excellence in the classroom, research opportunities, internships, and structured volunteer experiences give DU graduates a distinctive and measurable advantage. Each year, Drury sends approximately 20 students to medical school and another 20 to related health professional schools. There are more than 250 Drury graduates currently serving as healthcare professionals in southwest Missouri alone.

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Media Contacts: Dr. Beth Harville, Dean, College of Natural & Mathematical Sciences. Office: (417) 873-4085; email: bharville@drury.eduDianne Johnson, Vice President of Development & Alumni Relations. Office: (417) 873-7303; email: djohnson021@drury.edu.

Smith-Glynn-Callaway Foundation supports pre-med students via grants

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Aug. 5, 2015 — Drury University has received $14,000 in scholarship and research grants from the Smith-Glynn-Callaway Medical Foundation in support of the two organizations’ shared goal of promoting education in the medical field in the Ozarks.

The Foundation has once again awarded $10,000 for scholarships to students in Drury’s pre-health sciences programs. This relationship dates back more than 40 years, with proven results. More than half of those who have received Smith-Glynn-Callaway Pre-Med Undergraduate Scholarships in the last 10 years have attended, or are already accepted to, medical school. Other recipients have gone on to careers in nursing or as physician assistants.

This year the Foundation has given an additional $4,000 to fund summer research conducted by undergraduate students under the direction of assistant professor of chemistry Dr. Madhuri Manpadi. The research is focused on compounds that will help facilitate the discovery of new anti-cancer agents. Previous work on this project has been published in journals such as Organic Letters, Journal of Organic Chemistry, and others; and has been presented at American Chemical Society national and regional meetings.

Senior Kevin Liles prepares compounds for imaging in a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer as part of undergraduate research work funded by a grant from the Smith-Glynn-Callaway Foundation.

Senior Kevin Liles prepares compounds for characterizing in a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer as part of undergraduate research work funded by a grant from the Smith-Glynn-Callaway Foundation.

“We have students from the sophomore to senior levels conducting this work,” Dr. Manpadi said. “These aspiring doctors and scientists are learning and applying various chemistry techniques, and will have an opportunity to see their work published in international journals.”

“We are thankful for the Smith-Glynn-Callaway Foundation’s support of Drury’s pre-med students,” said Dr. Mark Wood, chair of the Pre-Health Sciences Program. “Their support of these talented undergraduates stretches beyond financial consideration. It truly helps shape the health care community of the future. Smith-Glynn-Callaway funding ensures Drury students will continue on their journey to be future health care providers here in Springfield, across Missouri, and beyond.”

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Media Contact: Dr. Mark Wood – Chair, Pre-Health Sciences Program. Office: (417) 873-7474. Email: mwood@drury.edu.

Drury University professor receives grant for documentary project

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Jan. 21, 2011 —Visiting Assistant Professor Dr. Monty Dobson received a $10,000 grant from the Kirby Foundation for the production of a documentary film about the Native American culture near St. Louis. Dobson’s company ShovelReady Productions will produce the film Cahokia: Native American City of Mystery.

The film examines the Cahokia Mounds, a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Site, in Collinsville, Ill., located approximately 18 miles to the east of St. Louis, Mo. “We are terrifically excited by the opportunity this generous grant from the Kirby Foundation offers to bring attention to the truly unique nature of the Cahokia site,” Dobson said.

Dr. Monty Dobson

Dobson partnered with Drury’s Artist in Residence, Patrick Mureithi, to produce the film. The 30-minute documentary will delve into the history of the Mississippian culture epicenter at Cahokia that flourished between A.D. 800 and 1400.

Dobson is an archaeologist, visiting assistant professor of history at Drury and founder of ShovelReady Productions. Dobson holds a Ph.D. in Archeology from the University of York in England. He has also served as a member of senior management with the internationally famous Jorvik Viking Centre Museum and lectured at universities around the world.

For more information about this film or other ShovelReady productions visit: www.montysworldonline.com.

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Partnership between Drury and Springfield Urban Agriculture Coalition receives $300,000 for School Yard Gardens

Springfield, MO, January 4, 2011—Drury University and the Springfield Urban Agriculture Coalition (SUAC) have received a $300,000 grant from the Missouri Foundation for Health. The three-year grant will fund The Dig In R-Twelve (DIRT) Project, which will plan and install ten school gardens throughout the Springfield R-XII district. DIRT, in collaboration with the Drury School of Education, will also provide and teach curriculum to address core state education standards and use the gardens to complement classroom learning by teaching healthy habits in a fun, active, hands-on environment. The grant also includes funds to establish infrastructure for an urban farm in a low-income neighborhood.

“Giving students the opportunity to help create, maintain, and harvest gardens at their school sites is an educational application of content from many areas of the curriculum,” says Ann Wallenmeyer, K-12 Science Facilitator at Springfield Public Schools. “Lessons will be learned that will reach far into a student’s future, well beyond public education,” Wallenmeyer remarked.
The DIRT Project aims to address increasing obesity rates in Missouri. It will promote healthy, active lifestyles by providing education to the community and the school children about the benefits of growing and using sustainably produced, locally grown food.

Midtown School Garden, located on Cox North property at Division and Benton, serves as Springfield’s pilot school garden for students from Boyd Elementary and Pipkin Middle School. Students use the garden as an extension of their classroom curriculum and help with duties such as planting and harvesting. Drury University’s School of Education and Child Development initially funded the Midtown School Garden through a $10,000 math grant from the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. CoxHealth and Community Partnership’s Caring Communities Initiative donated land and resources to initiate the first of the ten gardens that will receive funding from the grant. At the pilot garden, the grant will provide a high tunnel greenhouse that will allow students to utilize the garden year-round.

Applications have been sent to all schools in the R-XII district, and the additional nine schools to receive DIRT Project infrastructure and curriculum will be announced by the end of January 2011. Garden planning and installation will begin in February 2011.

The DIRT Project will collaborate with several Springfield organizations including Springfield R-XII Public School District; the YMCA; Childhood Obesity Action Group (COAG), Slow Food Southwest Missouri, CoxHealth, Community Partnership’s Caring Communities Initiative and Drury University.

Springfield Urban Agriculture Coalition (SUAC) promotes healthy lifestyles and environments through hands-on education about production and consumption of locally produced, natural, healthy foods.
The Missouri Foundation for Health provided funding for this project in whole. The Missouri Foundation for Health is a philanthropic organization with a vision to improve the health of the people in the communities it serves.

Visit springfielduac.org to learn more or help with additional materials, signage for gardens, fruit trees and shrubs.

Media Contact:
Springfield Urban Agriculture Coalition
Lucy Howell, Melissa Millsap
(417) 873-6343
lucy@springfielduac.org; mel@urbanrootsfarm.com

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Drury is an independent University, church related, grounded in the liberal arts tradition and committed to personalized education in a community of scholars who value the arts of teaching and learning. Education at Drury seeks to cultivate spiritual sensibilities and imaginative faculties as well as ethical insight and critical thought; to foster the integration of theoretical and practical knowledge; and to liberate persons to participate responsibly in and contribute to a global community. For more information, visit www.drury.edu/strategicplan.

Marketing and Communications staff are available to news media 24 hours a day at (417) 839-2886. Visit the Office of Marketing and Communications online at http://news.drury.edu. Resources include a searchable Expert Guide, staff contacts and downloadable print-quality images and logos.

Drury’s Habitat for Humanity Campus Chapter receives State Farm grant

NEWS: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Dec. 16, 2010 — Drury University’s Habitat for Humanity Campus Chapter has been selected to receive a $2,000 matching grant from State Farm® for its outstanding work in building safe, decent and affordable homes.

“We are grateful to have been selected as one of the matching grant recipients,” said chapter president Garret Shelenhamer. “The grant will help us to continue to make a difference in the lives of people in need of affordable housing.”

A campus chapter is a student-led, student-initiated organization on a high school or college campus that partners with the local Habitat affiliate to build, fundraise, advocate and educate to support the work of Habitat for Humanity. The Drury Campus Chapter partners with Habitat for Humanity of Springfield and has helped build more than 6 houses since 1994.

Drury University’s Campus Chapter is one of 29 campus chapters to be awarded a matching grant from State Farm, the national corporate sponsor of Habitat for Humanity’s youth programs. To qualify for the State Farm grant, the Drury Campus Chapter must raise a matching amount. The grant will be used to build houses in the community.

Scheduled fundraising activities include a birdhouse auction in April at Obelisk Home.

The Campus Chapters program is one of the many programs Habitat has to engage youth ages 5 to 25 in Habitat’s work. Since 2007, State Farm has served as the national corporate sponsor of Habitat for Humanity’s youth programs, with a sponsorship commitment of more than $1.1 million in grants each year. Additionally, State Farm offices contribute more than $500,000 annually to Habitat affiliates across the United States.

Media Contact:
Garret Shelenhamer
Drury University Habitat for Humanity Campus Chapter
Mobile: (417) 298-3005
E-mail: gshelenhamer@drury.edu

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Drury is an independent University, church related, grounded in the liberal arts tradition and committed to personalized education in a community of scholars who value the arts of teaching and learning. Education at Drury seeks to cultivate spiritual sensibilities and imaginative faculties as well as ethical insight and critical thought; to foster the integration of theoretical and practical knowledge; and to liberate persons to participate responsibly in and contribute to a global community. For more information, visit www.drury.edu/strategicplan.

Marketing and Communications staff are available to news media 24 hours a day at (417) 839-2886. Visit the Office of Marketing and Communications online at http://news.drury.edu. Resources include a searchable Expert Guide, staff contacts and downloadable print-quality images and logos.

Drury professor receives grant for music therapy in Barry and Lawrence Counties

NEWS: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Dec. 9, 2010

The $122,640 grant funds a music therapy clinic in Monett, Mo. that is a satellite of Drurys Center for Music Therapy and Wellness.  The Monett clinic is open five days a week with direct services provided by Jessica Edwards, MT-BC (Music Therapist-Board Certified). The grant also provides primary funding for a clinical supervisory position occupied by Julie Cassity, MS, MT-BC, whose office is in Drury’s on-campus music therapy clinic. As an added benefit, the Monett clinic serves as a local internship site for Drury music therapy students who cannot attend a more distant internship.

Dr. Michael Cassity

The Monett clinic was established in 2004 with a $38,736 grant. Since that time, funding has increased because of the growing numbers of residents requesting music therapy services, according to Cassity. Since the grant was first awarded in November of 2003, Cassity and Drury University have received over $800,000 in funding.

Clinical documentation and parental evaluations indicate that residents increase in skills such as language, socialization, following directions and attention span following the initiation of music therapy services. Parents and guardians also report that the residents seem happier, vocalize more, and enjoy the music skills they are learning. According to the American Music Therapy Association, music therapy is an established health care profession in which music is used within a therapeutic relationship to address physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs of individuals.

In addition to serving clients at the clinic, the Monett clinic maintains a community outreach by providing on-site services at facilities in Cassville and Monett. Additional support therapists at the Center’s Drury campus clinic are Leslie Richardson, MT-BC (Drury, 2008) and Carrie Jenkins, MT-BC (Drury, 2009).

Drury’s Bachelor of Music Therapy program, which was established in 2002, is a rapidly growing program that has recently expanded to include the Master of Music Therapy degree.

Contact:
Dr. Michael Cassity
Professor of Music Therapy
Office: (417) 873-7370
E-mail: mcassity@drury.edu

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Drury is an independent University, church related, grounded in the liberal arts tradition and committed to personalized education in a community of scholars who value the arts of teaching and learning. Education at Drury seeks to cultivate spiritual sensibilities and imaginative faculties as well as ethical insight and critical thought; to foster the integration of theoretical and practical knowledge; and to liberate persons to participate responsibly in and contribute to a global community. For more information, visit www.drury.edu/strategicplan.

Marketing and Communications staff are available to news media 24 hours a day at (417) 839-2886. Visit the Office of Marketing and Communications online at http://news.drury.edu. Resources include a searchable Expert Guide, staff contacts and downloadable print-quality images and logos.