events

Arbor Day celebration to be held at Drury University on Friday

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., April 20, 2017 — Drury University will celebrate Arbor Day and its designation as a Tree Campus USA during a public event at 2 p.m. Friday in the Hoblit Suite in Freeman Hall. The event is part of Drury’s Earth Day celebration.

The Arbor Day Foundation has designated Drury a “Tree Campus USA” for the third year in a row. Cindy Garner of the Missouri Department of Conservation will discuss the history of Arbor Day and Drury Head Groundskeeper Joe Fearn will give an update on the urban forest across the campus. Russell Hinnah, with the MDC and National Arbor Day Foundation State Coordinator, will present the Tree Campus award. Drury students will perform original poetry and music, and Drury Trustee Lyle Reed will also give remarks. A proclamation from City of Springfield declaring the day “Drury ArborDay 2017” will be presented as well.

Drury’s urban forest accounts for more than $1.2 million in capital assets. There are more than 1,000 trees and 90 species on campus.

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Media Contact: Joe Fearn, Assistant Director – Grounds: (417) 873-7414 or jfearn@drury.edu.

Sip & Savor Springfield serves up tasty treats to benefit two nonprofits

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., March 31, 2017 — Drury University’s Sigma Pi chapter is proud to present Sip & Savor Springfield, a charity dessert and beverage sampling fundraiser set for Saturday, April 8. The event will be held from 2 to 4:30 p.m. at the O’Reilly Family Event Center on the Drury University campus.

Sip & Savor Springfield will serve up the opportunity for some of the finest culinary minds in the Ozarks to combine what they do best with raising much-needed funds to support two area nonprofits, all while providing valuable real-world experience for college students planning the event.

All proceeds will benefit Harmony House, one of the state’s largest shelters and resource centers for domestic violence victims and their families, and Rare Breed, a resource center for at-risk and homeless youth.

Attendees will be able to sample decadent treats and tasty beverages from over 20 vendors, including Blue Bell Creameries, Chick-Fil-A, Chinese Chef, Corkscrew Catering, El Charro, Eurasia, Heart of America Beverage, Heroes Coffee, Hiland Dairy, Insomnia Cookies, June’s Cakery, Kilwins Branson, La Paloma, Neighbor’s Mill Bakery & Cafe, Panera Bread Bakery-Cafe, Springfield Brewing Company, Tea Bar & Bites, The Rim, and Truffles E Truffles Handmade Chocolates. More vendors will be announced in the coming days at sipsavorspringfield.com.

Although this is the inaugural year for Sip & Savor Springfield, Drury Sigma Pi members have built upon their experience gained while hosting last April’s Sugar Rush fundraiser, which raised over $8,500 for the two nonprofits.

“After the enormous success with Sugar Rush, we’ve spent the last year tweaking the original idea by adding new features and incorporating a wider variety of food and beverage options to ensure there’s something for everyone,” said Ethan Williamson, the student leading the Sip & Savor project team.

General admission tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door. VIP tickets are $30, student tickets are $10, and children eight and under are free. Tickets can be purchased in advance at sipsavorspringfield.com or at the door on the day of the event.

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Media Contact: Kent Otto, Drury Sigma Pi chapter director: (417) 459-6589 or kent@sipsavorspringfield.com.

Lynyrd Skynyrd to play O’Reilly Family Event Center on May 19

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., March 28, 2017 — Legendary southern rock group Lynyrd Skynyrd will take the stage at the O’Reilly Family Event Center on Friday, May 19.

Tickets start at $67 and go on sale starting at 10 a.m., this Friday, March 31, at www.drurytickets.com or by calling (417) 873-6389. Tickets may also be purchased in person at the OFEC box office, which is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays and 9 a.m. to noon on Saturdays.

skynyrd

With a catalog of over 60 albums, sales beyond 30 million worldwide and their beloved classic American rock anthem “Sweet Home Alabama” having over two million downloaded ringtones, Rock & Roll Hall of Famers Lynyrd Skynyrd remains a cultural icon that appeals to all generations.

Led by core members Gary Rossington (guitar), Johnny Van Zant (vocals) and Rickey Medlock (guitar), the band continues to record new albums and tour the country, building on the legacy that began over 35 years ago in Jacksonville, Florida. Joining them in the studio and on the road are new bassist Johnny Colt, guitarist Mark “Sparky” Matejka, and keyboardist Peter Keys.

More information: http://lynyrdskynyrd.com.

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Media Contact: Geoff Steele, O’Reilly Family Event Center Venue Coordinator: (417) 863-7843 or gsteele@drury.edu

Drury’s humanities film series returns to The Moxie on Saturday for spring run

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., March 21, 2017 — Drury University’s Humanities & Ethics Center has again partnered with the Moxie Cinema in downtown Springfield to host a series of screenings and open discussions at the local independent theater. The fifth season continues with three more films this spring following a winter break. The Drury Humanities & Arts Film Series is made possible by a grant from the Missouri Humanities Council.

The partnership between Drury and the nonprofit Moxie Cinema places a spotlight on films that ask enduring questions about the human condition and adds an open, facilitated discussion to the mix. After each showing, a Drury professor leads a group discussion about the movie’s themes. The post-film discussions are about 30 minutes each. Tickets are $5 and all screenings begin at 1 p.m.

Richard Schur

Richard Schur

The film series returns at 1 p.m. this Saturday, March 25 with a talk from Dr. Rich Schur following a screening of the Academy Award-winning 1997 Italian film “Life is Beautiful.” The film is a comedy and set during the Holocaust and tells the story of a Jewish librarian who uses fantasy and humor to shield his son from the grim reality of the death camps. It raises significant questions about the nature of comedy, as some critics argued that the film sanitized the Holocaust, misrepresenting the horror of the events. Others defended the film and believed it told a powerful story with humane values. In the post-film discussion, Dr. Schur, professor of English, will revisit this controversy and explore whether there are some limits comedy should not and cannot cross.

The remaining films in the series include:

April 1 – “The Sea Inside” with Dr. Chris Panza, professor of philosophy

April 22 ­– “Son of Man” with Dr. Teresa Hornsby, professor of religion

In addition to the Humanities and Arts Film Series, Dr. Shannon McMurtrey will bring his expertise in cybersecurity to a discussion of privacy and intelligence gathering following a screening of the 1974 classic “The Conversation” on Tuesday, April 18 as a part of The Moxie’s Science on Screen series.

For more information, go to http://www.moxiecinema.com.

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“Peter and the Wolf” tradition continues at Drury on Thursday, Feb. 16

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., February 14, 2017 — Drury University’s annual production of “Peter and the Wolf” for area third-graders will take place during two performances at 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 16, at the O’Reilly Family Event Center. This year’s performances are made possible in part thanks to a $12,900 grant from U.S. Bank, through the U.S. Bank Foundation.

For more than 40 years, students and faculty from Drury’s music, theater and education departments have collaborated to bring “Peter and the Wolf” to life for an elementary school audience. The 1936 work by Sergei Prokofiev is designed to teach children about the orchestra through an easy-to-understand fairytale about a boy and his animal friends being stalked by a wolf. Each character is represented by a different instrument and musical motif. In 2016, Drury revamped the program to include new emphasis on the humane treatment of animals. Nearly 3,000 third graders from Springfield and the surrounding area are expected to attend the two performances.

“We are very grateful for the support provided by U.S. Bank through its grant program,” says Christopher Koch, associate professor of music at Drury and music director of the SDCO and Springfield Regional Opera. “Not only will the funding help us to continue our 40-plus year tradition of presenting ‘Peter and the Wolf’ to our region’s third graders, it also supports the regionally and nationally acclaimed Springfield-Drury Civic Orchestra, a semi-professional ensemble-in-residence at Drury which allows our own students to sit side-by-side with professional musicians, faculty, and students drawn from across southwest Missouri.”

The U.S. Bank Foundation funds projects related to themes of workforce education, neighborhood revitalization, and arts and culture, organized under the umbrellas of Work, Home and Play. Support for the Springfield-Drury Civic Orchestra falls within Play and is an investment in the arts and culture of our community.

“U.S. Bank makes play possible by investing the bank’s financial resources in community programming that supports ways for children and adults to play and create in venues across the country,” said Steven Fox, Regional President.

Grant funding from U.S. Bank will support a full roster of orchestral events in SDCO’s 2017-18 season. For tickets and information about SDCO, visit www.sdco.drury.edu.

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Events explore lessons from WWII-era Japanese-American internment camps

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., January 31, 2017 — A multi-disciplinary series of events and performances at Drury University will tell the story of the internment camps set up by the U.S. government to hold Japanese-Americans during World War II. The camps were result of President Franklin Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066 signed in the weeks after the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.

Chikaraishi

Chikaraishi

“Life Interrupted: Art for Social Change” is a project that brings together the arts, humanities, history and political science departments at Drury, along with the greater Springfield community and the CORE Performance Company, to hear about the camps and ask what we can learn from the experience.

How have these same issues of civil rights violations, racial profiling, discrimination, immigration and xenophobia shifted, changed, or stayed the same? How do we ensure the safety of our country without discriminating against ethnic and religious minorities?

“It’s 75 years past and we’re still grappling with the same issues – fear of people we don’t know, fear of people who look different from us,” says Nancy Chikaraishi, a Drury architecture professor whose parents and grandparents were forced into the camps, and who is the lead organizer for the series of “Life Interrupted” events at Drury.

MORE: Read an interview with Chikaraishi about her personal connection to the internment camps and how she became involved in the “Life Interrupted” project.

The events begin on Thursday with a roundtable discussion with community leaders, followed by a dance workshop and art installation on Friday and a performance on Saturday of “Life Interrupted” by CORE, which is based in Atlanta and Houston. A final panel discussion on the nature of architecture and power will be held next week.

Full list of events:

Thursday, Feb. 2, 6 p.m. – Roundtable discussion with local community leaders led by Drury political science professors Dr. Daniel Ponder and Dr. Jeff Vandenberg, with representatives from the Islamic Society of Joplin, NAACP, Temple Israel, and PROMO. Location: Reed Auditorium, Trustee Science Center on the Drury campus.

Friday Feb. 3, 3-4:30 p.m. – Dance workshop and story circle with the CORE Performance Company. Participants will be guided through the story circle process, sharing personal stories related to the themes investigated in “Life Interrupted.” No previous dance experience is required. Participants are encouraged to wear clothing that will not inhibit moving freely. Location: Drury on C-Street Gallery, 233 E. Commercial Street.

Friday, Feb. 3, 5-8 p.m. – Interactive art installation & exhibition opening led by Nancy Chikaraishi and Drury students (following the dance workshop and story circle). Location: Drury on C-Street Gallery, 233 E. Commercial Street.

Saturday, Feb. 4, 7:30 p.m. – “Life Interrupted” dance theatrical performance by the CORE Performance Company. Reserve tickets for free online. Location: Wilhoit Theater, Breech School of Business, corner of Central Street and Drury Lane.

Tuesday, Feb. 7, 6-7:30 p.m. – Panel Discussion on Architecture & Power, led by Drury architecture professors Dr. Robert Weddle, Dr. Panos Leventis and Nancy Chikaraishi. Location: Drury on C-Street Gallery, 233 E. Commercial Street.

This project is supported in part by awards from the Mid-America Arts Alliance, National Endowment for the Arts, Missouri Arts Council, and foundations, corporations and individuals throughout Arkansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Texas, Springfield Regional Arts Council and Community Foundation of the Ozarks, DoubleTree by Hilton, Nelson and Kelley Still Nichols, Colorgraphic Printing, Drury University, Drury University’s Hammons School of Architecture and the L.E. Meador Center for Politics and Citizenship.

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Media Contact: Nancy Chikaraishi, Professor of Architecture: (417) 873-7459 or nchikaraishi@drury.edu.

“Life Interrupted” explores history of WWII camps through dance & art

 

Xenophobia and perseverance. Isolation and equality.

Fear. Hope. Humanity.

Those are a few of the themes that will be explored through a rich mixture of panel discussions, an interactive art installation, and a dance performance as Drury University hosts the “Life Interrupted” program on campus and at the Drury on C-Street Gallery in early February.

“Life Interrupted” tells the story of the internment camps set up by the U.S. government to hold Japanese-Americans in the days and years following the 1941 surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, and the nation’s subsequent entry into World War II. It explores themes that are as relevant today as they were seven decades ago as it examines the lives of those who were interned in the camps – including one not far from the Ozarks in Rohwer, Arkansas.

The project makes its way to Drury February 2 through 7, and will include public panel discussions, an interactive art installation by Drury students and a theatrical dance performance by the award winning CORE Performance Company of Atlanta and Houston at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, February 4. (Tickets are free but must be claimed – click here to do so.)

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It’s a personal story for Drury architecture professor Nancy Chikaraishi, whose parents were interned in Rohwer as young adults after being forced to move from their homes in California. Chikaraishi’s artwork is digitally projected during the performance and she is the visual arts collaborator on the project. She was instrumental in bringing “Life Interrupted” to Drury and is the lead organizer for the series of events.

“It’s a personal story because my parents experienced it, and my grandparents experienced it,” she says. “And I still meet people who have never heard of the camps, especially the ones in Arkansas. People don’t know it happened, and when they find out they’re really surprised. Surprised, then shocked that Americans did this to other Americans.”

The surprise and shock continues to resonate, Chikaraishi says, when we consider the historical parallels to today as issues such as a Muslim registry and ethnic profiling make headlines.

“It’s 75 years past and we’re still grappling with the same issues – fear of people we don’t know, fear of people who look different from us,” she says.

Chikaraishi first became involved with the “Life Interrupted” dance project through the WWII Japanese American Internment Museum in Rohwer, in rural southeast Arkansas. Her original artwork, which was inspired by the stories her parents told her about the camps, was exhibited by the museum and caught the attention of Sue Schroeder, CORE’s artistic director. The dance performance is the project’s centerpiece and CORE has performed “Gaman,” the precursor to “Life Interrupted,” at the University of Central Arkansas and at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in northwest Arkansas.

Chikaraishi

Chikaraishi

“It’s a really powerful performance,” Chikaraishi says. “It’s amazing that an art form that doesn’t use words is able to process a historical event and express really deep emotions through movement and interaction.”

The series of events kicks off at 6 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 2 with a roundtable discussion featuring community leaders from NAACP, Grupo Latinoamericano, the Mayor’s Commission on Human Rights, the Islamic Society of Joplin, and PROMO (Promoting Equality for All Missourians). On Friday, Feb. 3, CORE will conduct a dance workshop/story circle from 4 to 5:30 p.m. at the Drury on C-Street Gallery, followed by an art exhibit by Chikaraishi and the interactive art installation by Drury students from 6 to 8 p.m. Both exhibits will be part of the monthly First Friday Artwalk. The “Life Interrupted” dance performance is at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 4 at the Wilhoit Theater on campus. Finally, a panel discussion on “Architecture, Space & Power” will be held at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 7, also at the Drury on C-Street Gallery.

For Chikaraishi, the series of events will be a reminder of what her family went through those many years ago, and she hopes it will be just that – a reminder – for others as well.

“America is a place that is very open to others,” she says, “but we have to keep remembering that.”

This is project is supported in part by awards from the Mid-America Arts Alliance, National Endowment for the Arts, Missouri Arts Council, and foundations, corporations and individuals throughout Arkansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Texas, Springfield Regional Arts Council and Community Foundation of the Ozarks, DoubleTree by Hilton, Nelson and Kelley Still Nichols, Colorgraphic Printing, Drury University, Drury University’s Hammons School of Architecture and the L.E. Meador Center for Politics and Citizenship.

For more information, email Nancy Chikaraishi at nchikaraishi@drury.edu. You can view her artwork at www.nancychikaraishi.com. All of the events can be found on Drury’s D.Cal event calendar.

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Drury University to dedicate new campus green space on Thursday

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., December 14, 2016 — Drury University will dedicate Russell H. Keller Park, a campus green space, with a ceremony at 10 a.m., Thursday, Dec. 15. The green space itself is located on the north end of campus near the Drury fraternity quad, but the ceremony will be held indoors at Freeman Panhellenic Hall.

The space is the result of a real estate gift from Drury alumnus Russell Keller. Keller earned an MBA from Drury in 1967, and spent nearly three decades serving the public as Greene County Recorder of Deeds. Formerly the site of two adjacent single-family properties, the now open space runs along the south side of Calhoun Street between Robberson and Jefferson avenues.

“Drury University is very grateful to Mr. Keller for this gift,” says Drury President Dr. Tim Cloyd. “Russell has been a friend and supporter of Drury for decades, and this gift will help us continue to shape the physical campus for decades yet to come.”

Speakers will include Ron Cushman, Director of Facilities, and Brian Shipman, a Drury faculty member who is a highly active volunteer with the Midtown Neighborhood Association. Remarks from Drury alumnus Larry O’Reilly, a friend and former neighbor of Mr. Keller, will also be read at the ceremony.

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Drury & Student Veterans of America to hold Veterans Day ceremony

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., November 7, 2016 — Drury University and the Drury chapter of Student Veterans of America will hold a public Veterans Day ceremony at 11 a.m., Friday, Nov. 11 at the Plaster Gallery in the O’Reilly Family Event Center.

The event will feature guest speaker Clayton Jones, an Army veteran who served in the Vietnam War and is a member of the Order of the Purple Heart. Also present as a special guest will be 96-year-old World War II veteran Jim Maudlin. University Chaplain Dr. Peter Browning will offer the invocation and Lorelei Valkenburg, treasurer of the Drury chapter of Student Veterans of America, will lead the Pledge of Allegiance. Drury choral music students will sing the national anthem and Dr. Tijuana Julian will play “Taps.”

Refreshments will be provided after the ceremony. Visitor parking is available in Lot 7 on Summit Avenue, just north of Harrison Stadium. For more information, call, (417) 873-6908.

Drury’s tradition of serving those who have served our country dates back to the days following World War II, when buses brought soldiers from Fort Leonard Wood to classes held on the Springfield campus. The commitment continues today. Drury has been named a “Military Friendly School” by Victory Media for five straight years. The university is also a supporter school of the Order of the Purple Heart and is a Yellow Ribbon School. Drury supports federal initiatives that help veterans and active-duty service members apply for, pay for and complete their degrees and has designated staff to help coordinate these services.

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Barker connection brings free screening of award-winning “Lion Ark” to Drury

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., November 2, 2016 — The award-winning film “Lion Ark” – the story of the dramatic rescue of 25 lions from circuses in Bolivia – makes its Missouri premiere at 7 p.m., Monday, November 7 at Drury University’s Lay Hall Auditorium ahead of its release on DVD later this month.

Moviegoers can enjoy “Lion Ark” free of charge, followed by a Q&A with the filmmakers and rescue team. Director Tim Phillips and Jan Creamer of Animal Defenders International will be present. The film is opening a nationwide roadshow in Springfield in honor of Bob Barker, who funded the dramatic rescue mission documented in the movie. The Drury University Forum on Animal Rights, which is hosting the screening, is entirely supported by the Bob Barker Endowment Fund for the Study of Animal Rights.

Tickets can be claimed online or by calling (417) 873-7328.

“Lion Ark” tells the story of the daring rescue by Animal Defenders International (ADI) to enforce a ban on the use of animals in circuses in Bolivia. More action adventure than traditional documentary, “Lion Ark” is up close and personal, in the thick of the action. Circuses defy the law but are tracked down, animals are saved, and a joyous finale sees 25 lions airlifted to freedom. The critically acclaimed movie took film festivals by storm, earning 11 awards and garnering praise from critics and outlets such as the New York Times and National Geographic.

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“I am delighted to have helped ADI give these animals a wonderful new life after they have endured so much misery,” says Bob Barker, a 1947 Drury graduate. “Circuses are no place for animals, and lions and tigers should not be forced to live in small cages on the backs of trucks, or elephants forced to live in chains in the name of entertainment. Circuses with animals are cruel and archaic.”

“We are absolutely thrilled to be hosting the Missouri premiere of the dazzling, magical, and award-winning, ‘Lion Ark’ at Drury University,” says Dr. Patricia McEachern, Dorothy Jo Barker Endowed Professor for the Study of Animal Rights. “The evening will be made even more special by the presence of Jan Creamer and Tim Phillips who will share their amazing experiences with the audience. We are so proud of alumnus Bob Barker, a genuine hero to animals, without whom this event would not be possible.”

Find out more about “Lion Ark” and view a trailer at www.lionarkthemovie.com.

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