education

Eleven years of “Building Community through the Arts” at Drury University

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., June 14, 2011 — For the eleventh straight year, Drury graduate students are partnering with The Kitchen, Inc. to create and inspire art with residents of the Missouri Hotel.

The artwork produced by Missouri Hotel residents, a shelter for homeless single females, families or couples, will be shown on Friday, June 17 at the Missouri Hotel from 2-3 p.m. The theme of the art show is “Pieces of my dreams.”

“We chose that theme because the residents are visioning a fresh start in their lives,” said Gwen Marshall, a Drury graduate student.

The graduate course, Building Community through the Arts, is designed to offer students an approach to creativity in everyday living and learning, while giving students the opportunity to make a difference within the Drury neighborhood by introducing residents of the Missouri Hotel to visual arts, music and literature. “We are giving residents an opportunity to have relaxing, art-making time because that nourishes the human spirit, to have creative time and quiet time,” says Dr. Rebecca Burrell, Drury adjunct professor of education. Besides the opportunity to work with the Missouri Hotel residents, Drury students gain an understanding of visual and performing arts while also examining poverty in America.

Besides Marshall, other graduate students taking the class are: Scott Pearson, Marcia Wheeler and Kacie Craig.

The art show is free and open to the public.

During the eleven years of the class, Dr. Burrell estimates that she has had about 75 students take the class and has worked with over 160 Missouri Hotel residents.

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More Drury students join the Ozarks Teacher Corps

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 26, 2011 — Drury University members of the Ozarks Teacher Corps attended the recent Rural Education Rendezvous in Thomasville, Mo., where representatives from the Rural Learning Center in South Dakota did a workshop encouraging the aspiring teachers to become leaders in their rural communities.

Five Drury students were introduced as members of the second class of the Ozarks Teacher Corps, which awards $4,000 annual scholarships to teacher-education majors who will commit to teaching in a rural community for at least three years after graduation.

Those five new members – sophomore Annie Brechbuhler, juniors Stephanie Sechler and Kelly Wardle, and seniors Brandi Case and Katherine Espy – join several Drury students who were inducted into the inaugural class of the Ozarks Teacher Corps in 2010. Several of the graduating members of the inaugural class have accepted jobs in rural districts.

The Ozarks Teachers Corps scholarships are made possible by the Chesley and Flora Lee Wallis Scholarship Fund and the Henry J. and Lucille J. Straus Scholarship Fund, both created by generous donors committed to ensuring advanced education for Ozarks students. Both scholarship funds support students involved in the Rural Schools Partnership, an initiative of the Community Foundation of the Ozarks dedicated to strengthening rural schools as anchors of their communities.

Front Row (left to right): Stephanie Sechler, Willard; Katherine Espy, Marshfield; Morgan Mais, Marionville; Whitney Packwood, Billings; Lauren Albrecht, Republic; Jessica Joiner, Lebanon; and Annie Brechbuhler , Aurora. Back Row (left to right): CFO Chairman David Pointer; Gina Crunkilton, Drury-Cabool faculty; Brandi Case, Sparta; Rachael Buck, Springfield; Kathy Bradshaw, Norwood; Albert Bryant, Everton; and Kelly Wardle, Willow Springs.

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Drury partners with a Springfield vision clinic

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., March 17, 2011 —Drury University and the Beisner Vision Rehabilitation Center of the Ozarks held a grand opening for the Drury University Children’s Vision Center (DU CVC) in Springfield on Friday, March 11.

The DU CVC will provide visually impaired children, up to three years old, and their families with the initial supports to have a positive impact on development during the early childhood years. Prior to the opening of the DU CVC, parents in southwest Missouri would have to drive to Kansas City to receive the same kind of support and services.

Some of the supports provided by the DU CVC include:

  • A home visit to collect information about the child and their family
  • A Functional Vision Assessment to measure how the child uses their vision and what visual skills the child needs to develop further
  • Monthly monitoring sessions with a Certified Teacher of the Visually Impaired
  • Consultation provided to parents and other care providers
  • Resources on the community, state, and national levels that are available to children and families

The DU CVC is located in the Vision Rehabilitation Center of the Ozarks at 1661 W. Elfindale in Springfield. For more information please call (417) 831-0555 or visit www.drury.edu

Media Contact: Dr. Chris Craig, Director of the School of Education and Child Development, Office: (417) 873-77344, E-mail: ccraig@drury.edu

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Springfield Urban Agriculture Coalition announces Dig In R-Twelve (DIRT) Project Garden Awards

Springfield, MO, January 26, 2011—Springfield Urban Agriculture Coalition has awarded ten Springfield R-12 schools with DIRT Project Gardens. The Dig In R-Twelve (DIRT) Project will plan and install the ten school gardens and, in collaboration with the Drury School of Education, will also provide and teach curriculum to address core state education standards and use the gardens to complement classroom learning by teaching healthy habits in a fun, active, hands-on environment.

The ten awarded schools include: Glendale High School; Delaware Elementary; Weller Elementary; McGregor Elementary; David Harrison Elementary; Eugene Field Elementary; York Elementary; Rountree Elementary; Jarrett Middle School and the Midtown School Garden, a DIRT pilot project utilized by Boyd elementary and Pipkin Middle School.

Garden design, planning and installation will begin immediately for Glendale, Delaware, Weller, McGregor and Midtown School Garden. The five remaining gardens will be installed for the 2011-2012 school year.

The DIRT Project aims to address increasing obesity rates in Missouri. It will promote healthy, active lifestyles by providing education to the community and the school children about the benefits of growing and using sustainably produced, locally grown food.

The DIRT Project will collaborate with several Springfield organizations including Springfield R-XII Public School District; the YMCA; Childhood Obesity Action Group (COAG), Slow Food Southwest Missouri, CoxHealth, Community Partnership’s Caring Communities Initiative and Drury University.

Springfield Urban Agriculture Coalition (SUAC) promotes healthy lifestyles and environments through hands-on education about production and consumption of locally-produced, natural, healthy foods.

Funding for this project was provided in whole by the Missouri Foundation for Health. The Missouri Foundation for Health is a philanthropic organization whose vision is to improve the health of the people in the communities it serves.

Visit springfielduac.org to learn more or help with additional materials, signage for gardens, fruit trees, and shrubs. Donations are welcome!

Contact: Springfield Urban Agriculture Coalition, Name: Lucy Howell, Melissa Millsap, Phone: (417) 873-6343, Email: lucy@springfielduac.org; mel@urbanrootsfarm.com

Partnership between Drury and Springfield Urban Agriculture Coalition receives $300,000 for School Yard Gardens

Springfield, MO, January 4, 2011—Drury University and the Springfield Urban Agriculture Coalition (SUAC) have received a $300,000 grant from the Missouri Foundation for Health. The three-year grant will fund The Dig In R-Twelve (DIRT) Project, which will plan and install ten school gardens throughout the Springfield R-XII district. DIRT, in collaboration with the Drury School of Education, will also provide and teach curriculum to address core state education standards and use the gardens to complement classroom learning by teaching healthy habits in a fun, active, hands-on environment. The grant also includes funds to establish infrastructure for an urban farm in a low-income neighborhood.

“Giving students the opportunity to help create, maintain, and harvest gardens at their school sites is an educational application of content from many areas of the curriculum,” says Ann Wallenmeyer, K-12 Science Facilitator at Springfield Public Schools. “Lessons will be learned that will reach far into a student’s future, well beyond public education,” Wallenmeyer remarked.
The DIRT Project aims to address increasing obesity rates in Missouri. It will promote healthy, active lifestyles by providing education to the community and the school children about the benefits of growing and using sustainably produced, locally grown food.

Midtown School Garden, located on Cox North property at Division and Benton, serves as Springfield’s pilot school garden for students from Boyd Elementary and Pipkin Middle School. Students use the garden as an extension of their classroom curriculum and help with duties such as planting and harvesting. Drury University’s School of Education and Child Development initially funded the Midtown School Garden through a $10,000 math grant from the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. CoxHealth and Community Partnership’s Caring Communities Initiative donated land and resources to initiate the first of the ten gardens that will receive funding from the grant. At the pilot garden, the grant will provide a high tunnel greenhouse that will allow students to utilize the garden year-round.

Applications have been sent to all schools in the R-XII district, and the additional nine schools to receive DIRT Project infrastructure and curriculum will be announced by the end of January 2011. Garden planning and installation will begin in February 2011.

The DIRT Project will collaborate with several Springfield organizations including Springfield R-XII Public School District; the YMCA; Childhood Obesity Action Group (COAG), Slow Food Southwest Missouri, CoxHealth, Community Partnership’s Caring Communities Initiative and Drury University.

Springfield Urban Agriculture Coalition (SUAC) promotes healthy lifestyles and environments through hands-on education about production and consumption of locally produced, natural, healthy foods.
The Missouri Foundation for Health provided funding for this project in whole. The Missouri Foundation for Health is a philanthropic organization with a vision to improve the health of the people in the communities it serves.

Visit springfielduac.org to learn more or help with additional materials, signage for gardens, fruit trees and shrubs.

Media Contact:
Springfield Urban Agriculture Coalition
Lucy Howell, Melissa Millsap
(417) 873-6343
lucy@springfielduac.org; mel@urbanrootsfarm.com

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Drury is an independent University, church related, grounded in the liberal arts tradition and committed to personalized education in a community of scholars who value the arts of teaching and learning. Education at Drury seeks to cultivate spiritual sensibilities and imaginative faculties as well as ethical insight and critical thought; to foster the integration of theoretical and practical knowledge; and to liberate persons to participate responsibly in and contribute to a global community. For more information, visit www.drury.edu/strategicplan.

Marketing and Communications staff are available to news media 24 hours a day at (417) 839-2886. Visit the Office of Marketing and Communications online at http://news.drury.edu. Resources include a searchable Expert Guide, staff contacts and downloadable print-quality images and logos.

Opportunities for students to become teachers in rural areas

For Immediate Release: October 12

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Oct. 12, 2010 — As the job market slows and jobs in education become tougher to find, the Ozarks Teacher Corps reaches out to future college graduates to teach in rural school districts. Drury University, Missouri State, and Ozarks Technical Community College have a total of eighteen students in this elite program.

Each student receives $4,000 a year to become a teacher, in return they pledge three years after graduation to a rural district in southwest Missouri. The initiative is possible thanks to a $1.7 million donation administered through Springfield’s Community Foundation of the Ozarks.

“One of my professors came to me and said ‘I know you’re from a small town. I think this would be a great opportunity for you’,” said Drury student, Melissa Payne.

Nearly 20 percent of the school-age population attends rural schools. Gary Funk, president of the Community Foundation of the Ozarks, hopes that these future teachers will develop into “rural activists”, and stay with their communities long-term.

“There is a glimmer of hope for opportunities for employment,” said Drury School of Education Director, Chris Craig. “I think this is a real unique initiative to show everyone that there are some positive things happening in education.”

In the spring of 2011, the program hopes to add eight more students.

Media Contact:
Dr. Chris Craig
Director of the School of Education and Child Development
Office: (417) 873-7344
E-mail: ccraig@drury.edu

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Drury is an independent University, church related, grounded in the liberal arts tradition and committed to personalized education in a community of scholars who value the arts of teaching and learning. Education at Drury seeks to cultivate spiritual sensibilities and imaginative faculties as well as ethical insight and critical thought; to foster the integration of theoretical and practical knowledge; and to liberate persons to participate responsibly in and contribute to a global community. For more information, visitwww.drury.edu/strategicplan.

University Communications staff are available to news media 24 hours a day at (417) 839-2886. Visit the Office of University Communications online at http://news.drury.edu. Resources include a searchable Expert Guide, staff contacts and downloadable print-quality images and logos.

Acclaimed author and speaker to discuss learning disabilities at Drury

For Immediate Release: September 16

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Sept. 16, 2010 — Drury University will host the Developing Successful Youth (DSY) conference on Sept. 24 in Clara Thompson Hall from 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Author and speaker Rick Lavoie will present a talk titled, “It’s So Much Work to Be Your Friend: Helping the Child with Learning Disabilities Find Social Success.”

According to Lavoie, students with learning disabilities often fail due to a lack of social skills not academic skills. In this seminar, Lavoie will discuss the impact of social incompetence in a child’s daily life, the use of social skill “autopsies” to improve social interaction, a review of the history of learning disabilities, and how current approaches can be improved.

This daylong conference will appeal to educators, as well as parents of children with learning disabilities, Asperger’s syndrome and autism. The registration fee is $150, but there is a discounted rate for groups of 10 or more. Students may attend for $35. For additional information, contact Dr. Jayne White at (417) 873-7260 or visit the website at www.drury.edu/dsy.

Contact:
Dr. Jayne White
Professor of Education
Office: (417) 873-7260
E-mail: jwhite@drury.edu

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Drury is an independent University, church related, grounded in the liberal arts tradition and committed to personalized education in a community of scholars who value the arts of teaching and learning. Education at Drury seeks to cultivate spiritual sensibilities and imaginative faculties as well as ethical insight and critical thought; to foster the integration of theoretical and practical knowledge; and to liberate persons to participate responsibly in and contribute to a global community. For more information, visitwww.drury.edu/strategicplan.

University Communications staff are available to news media 24 hours a day at (417) 839-2886. Visit the Office of University Communications online at http://news.drury.edu. Resources include a searchable Expert Guide, staff contacts and downloadable print-quality images and logos.