Center for Gifted Education

Drury partners with Duke University to recognize promising young scholars

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 25, 2017—Drury University’s Center for Gifted Education and Pre-College Programs, together with the Duke University Talent Identification Program (TIP), will honor more than 400 of Missouri’s most promising young scholars at a recognition ceremony at 11 a.m. Friday at the O’Reilly Family Event Center. Central High School senior and international baccalaureate student Isabel Lai will be the keynote speaker.

To qualify for recognition, seventh-grade honorees must take the ACT or SAT and score at a level equal to or better than 50 percent of the juniors and seniors who took the test. Seventh graders only need to achieve a qualifying score on any one section to be recognized by Duke TIP, or a student could qualify with slightly lower marks on a majority of sections. Duke TIP, a nonprofit organization, has conducted an annual search for academically talented youth across the country since its founding in 1980. Drury University has hosted the annual statewide recognition event since 1981.

Drury has been a national leader in providing education and enrichment programs for academically gifted students more than 30 years. The Drury Center for Gifted Education is the most complete center for gifted education in the state of Missouri, and is one of less than 20 complete gifted education centers in the United States. Each summer, more than 700 children from pre-K through high school attend Drury’s educational camps for gifted students.

More information: https://www.drury.edu/gifted-education.

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Drury’s annual summer camps for gifted students now underway

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., July 13, 2016 — Gifted students from across the area are keeping their minds in shape over the summer break during camps organized by Drury University’s Center for Gifted Education, in partnership with Springfield Public Schools.

Drury provides summer experiences for gifted students from pre-K through the 11th grade. The younger age groups are in half-day camps at Sunshine Elementary School, while older students have a residential experience on the Drury campus. Each summer, more than 700 total students attend these camps.

Elementary School Students

The camps for younger students (called Summer Pals for ages pre-K through grade 1, and Summer Quest for grades 2 through 5) are taking place from each weekday 8:15 to 11:30 a.m. at Sunshine Elementary School, 421 E. Sunshine Street, now through Friday, July 22. The hands-on, activity-oriented courses feature an array of interesting experiences geared specifically toward gifted students. Summer Quest and Summer Pals give students a chance to interact with peers of similar academic abilities and interests, while encouraging them to use their intellectual and creative side.

VIDEO: Gifted Education Students Convene for Summer Camps

“It gives them a sense of self and a sense of community,” says Mary Potthoff, Director of the Center for Gifted Education at Drury. “And it builds on what they’ve learned in the classroom during the school year, keeping their minds engaged during the summer break.”

Media are invited to cover the Summer Quest and Summer Pals camps. Opportunities for coverage are available each day of the camps, including classes on robotics, dinosaurs, toy box physics, veterinarians, “grossology,” astronauts and more.

Middle & High School Students

The camps for older students – called Summerscape for middle schoolers and Drury Leadership Academy (DLA) for high schoolers – allow students to take two weeks of in-depth classes and go hands-on in areas that interest them such as robotics, photography and videography, improv comedy, bio-ethics, world culture and much more. They are considered “pre-college” camps in that students live on campus and participate in activities ranging from games to lectures in the evenings. DLA students can potentially earn college credit for completion.

“The camps not only give this particular group of students the kind of enrichment they crave, but they also provide them with a sense of community and give them a taste of what life is like on a college campus,” Potthoff says.

About the Center for Gifted Education

Drury has been a national leader in providing education and enrichment programs for academically gifted students more than 30 years. The Drury Center for Gifted Education is the most complete center for gifted education in the state of Missouri, and is one of less than 20 complete gifted education centers in the United States. Visit Drury Gifted Education for more information.

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Media Contact: Mary Potthoff, Director of the Center for Gifted Education: (417) 873-7386 or mpotthof@drury.edu.

 

Drury hosts recognition ceremony for promising Missouri scholars Friday

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 19, 2016 — The Drury Center for Gifted Education, in partnership with the Duke University Talent Identification Program (TIP), will honor more than 400 of Missouri’s most promising young scholars at a recognition ceremony at 11 a.m., Friday, May 20 in the O’Reilly Family Event Center. Central High School student and former Duke TIP honoree Amanda Morrison will be the keynote speaker.

To qualify for recognition, seventh-grade honorees must take the ACT or SAT and score at a level equal to or better than 50 percent of the high school juniors and seniors who took the test. Duke TIP, a nonprofit organization, has conducted an annual search for academically talented youth in the state of Missouri as well as 15 other states since its founding in 1980.

Drury University has hosted the annual statewide recognition event since 1981. Representatives from Drury, Duke TIP and Springfield Public Schools’ gifted education program will be available for comment to the media before or after the ceremony.

Drury has been a national leader in providing education and enrichment programs for academically gifted students more than 30 years. The Drury Center for Gifted Education is the most complete center for gifted education in the state of Missouri, and is one of less than 20 complete gifted education centers in the United States. Each summer, more than 700 children from pre-K through high school attend Drury’s educational camps for gifted students. Visit Drury Gifted Education for more information.

The Center is part of Drury’s School of Education and Child Development, which is the longest continually accredited School of Education in the state of Missouri. Drury undergraduate and graduate programs in education have a decades-long record of adding value to the lives of children and youth by preparing highly effective teachers and leaders for work in schools throughout the Ozarks region and beyond.

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Media Contact: Mary Potthoff, Director of the Center for Gifted Education – (417) 873-7386; (417) 885-8089 or mpotthof@drury.edu.

Drury gifted camps a family tradition for mother and daughter

As a kid, Mandy Long eagerly anticipated the annual summer camps for academically gifted kids at Drury. From the time she was in fourth grade through the end of high school, she spent two weeks living on campus and diving into cool topics like zoology, caves and video editing.

“I was excited for the fun of it all and to be around people who were like-minded,” Long says, “but I was also excited because I got to do things that most students didn’t get to do.”

Mandy Long and her daughter, Callie.

Mandy Long and her daughter, Callie.

Now, as a mother, she’s getting a kick out of seeing the same sense of excitement in her daughter Callie – a second-generation gifted camper. You might call it a family tradition.

Callie, who enters first grade this fall, just wrapped up her second year at Summer Pals, for kids ages Pre-K through first grade. Both Summer Pals and Summer Quest (second through fifth grades) take place at the Springfield Public Schools’ Phelps Center for Gifted Education. Summerscape and Drury Leadership Academy, both for older students, take place on the Drury campus later this month.

Her favorite class last year was “Country Kitchen,” in which the kids learned how to cook foods from countries around the world. This year, it’s “Grossology,” where she’s learned about how eyeballs work, how scabs are formed and toured the city’s wastewater treatment plant.

Callie says she likes spending extended time on one topic.

“(The classes) are fun because they teach me about only a few things for a few days, and in school they teach me about a lot of things for a lot of days,” she says.

Long, who eventually ended up attending Drury in part because it “felt like home” after all those summers, hopes Callie will make memories and friendships similar to her own. She and about 130 other early 1990s Summerscape kids keep in touch through a Facebook group.

“I remember the classes, but it was also the friendships that stuck with me,” Long says.

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Story by Mike Brothers, Drury’s director of media relations.

Summer camps for gifted students now underway at Drury University

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., June 17, 2015 — Gifted young students from across the area are keeping their minds in shape over the summer break during camps organized by Drury University’s Center for Gifted Education, in partnership with Springfield Public Schools.

Drury provides a summer experience for gifted students of all ages, from pre-K through the 11th grade. The younger age groups are in camps right now, and the older students’ camps will take place in July. Each summer, more than 700 total students attend these camps.

The current camps (called Summer Pals for ages pre-K through grade 1, and Summer Quest for grades 2 through 5) are taking place from each weekday 8:15 to 11:30 a.m. at Phelps Center for the Gifted, 934 S. Kimbrough Ave. now through Friday, June 26. The hands-on, activity-oriented courses feature an array of interesting experiences geared specifically toward gifted students. Summer Quest and Summer Pals give students a chance to interact with peers of similar academic abilities and interests, while encouraging them to use their intellectual and creative sides.

     VIDEO: Gifted Education Students Convene for Summer Camps

“It gives them a sense of self and a sense of community,” says Mary Potthoff, Director of the Center for Gifted Education at Drury. “And it builds on what they’ve learned in the classroom during the school year, keeping their minds engaged during the summer break.”

Drury has been a national leader in providing education and enrichment programs for academically gifted students more than 30 years. The Drury Center for Gifted Education is the most complete center for gifted education in the state of Missouri, and is one of less than 20 complete gifted education centers in the United States. Visit Drury Gifted Education for more information.

Media are invited to cover the Summer Quest and Summer Pals camps. Opportunities for coverage are available each day of the camps, including classes on robotics, dinosaurs, veterinarians, astronauts and much more. 

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Drury hosts recognition ceremony for promising Missouri scholars

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 22, 2015 — The Drury Center for Gifted Education, in partnership with the Duke University Talent Identification Program (TIP), will honor more than 400 of Missouri’s most promising young scholars at a recognition ceremony at 11 a.m. today, Friday, May 22 in the O’Reilly Family Event Center. Central High School Student and former Duke TIP honoree, Amanda Morrison, will be the keynote speaker.

To qualify for recognition, seventh-grade honorees must take the ACT or SAT and score at a level equal to or better than 50 percent of the high school juniors and seniors who took the test. Duke TIP, a nonprofit organization, has conducted an annual search for academically talented youth in the state of Missouri as well as 15 other states since its founding in 1980.

Drury University has hosted the annual statewide recognition event since 1981. Representatives from Drury, Duke TIP and Springfield Public Schools’ gifted education program will be available for comment to the media before or after the ceremony. Members of the media can contact Media Relations Director Mike Brothers at (417) 873-7390 to make arrangements.

Drury has been a national leader in providing education and enrichment programs for academically gifted students more than 30 years. The Drury Center for Gifted Education is the most complete center for gifted education in the state of Missouri, and is one of less than 20 complete gifted education centers in the United States. Each summer, more than 700 children from pre-K through high school attend Drury’s residential and non-residential pre-college programs. Visit Drury Gifted Education for more information.

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Statewide gifted education conference at DU focuses on STEM – and more

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Oct. 14, 2014 — A statewide conference taking place on the Drury campus later this week will explore two parts of the educational spectrum that aren’t often discussed together – gifted education and learning disabilities.

The Gifted Association of Missouri (GAM) will hold its annual conference on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 17 and 18 on the DU campus. The conference theme is “FULL STE²AM AHEAD.” Most people are familiar with the focus on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) in today’s classrooms. The “STE²AM” theme adds two additional components. The first is “twice-exceptional” students who meet the eligibility requirements for both giftedness and learning disabilities (for example, a student may be delayed in language arts but advanced in mathematics). The second component is the arts.

The conference will take place in Lay Hall and the Findlay Student Center. For more information about the conference or to set up interviews, contact Mary Potthoff, director of Drury’s Center for Gifted Education, at (417) 873-7386 or mpotthof@drury.edu; or Robin Lady, executive vice president with GAM at (314) 203-1165 or robin.lady.gam@gmail.com.

About Drury’s Center for Gifted Education

Drury has been a national leader in providing education and enrichment programs for academically gifted students more than 30 years. The Drury Center for Gifted Education is the most complete center for gifted education in the state of Missouri and is one of less than 20 complete gifted education centers in the United States. Visit Drury.edu/giftededucation for more information.

About GAM

The Gifted Association of Missouri has actively supported the needs of high-ability and high-potential learners in Missouri since 1980. GAM provides teacher training, curriculum development, parent support, regional seminars and workshops, scholarships, student competitions and awards. For further information, visit: www.mogam.org.

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Student chooses Drury thanks to summer camps

Aaron Sawyer begins his college career at Drury University this fall. But unlike most incoming freshmen who’ve spent perhaps a day or two on campus prior to move-in day, Sawyer has spent the last six summers here making memories with truly like-minded friends.

The Sikeston native is one of hundreds who have attended Drury’s summer camps for academically gifted students since 1981. The camps give kids like Sawyer a chance to be around others who are equally as bright, curious and engaged.

Aaron Sawyer

“It can be difficult” to be a gifted kid in school, he says. “You almost feel like you don’t want to talk for fear of being different.”

The camps are for students from pre-K to 12th grade and are divided by age groups. The camp for middle school students (called Summerscape) and the camp for high schoolers (Drury Leadership Academy) are wrapping up this week. Programs for younger students took place in June.

Sawyer began coming to the camps in middle school. He’s taken classes on digital photography, philosophy, speech and debate, the human body, Rube Goldberg machines and more. He’s made great friends, too.

“You’ll make friends here and come back next year and continue a conversation you left off last summer like no time has passed,” he says. “It’s a unique experience I feel like you don’t get many other places.”

Sawyer says being away from home in a college-like environment has helped him come out of his shell.

“If I hadn’t been (coming to the camps) for this long, I probably wouldn’t be able to give this interview,” says the soft-spoken Sawyer. “I would have been way too nervous.”

Sawyer plans to double major in history and education and hopes to become a college professor. He chose Drury before his sophomore year in high school.

“I feel like (Drury) has invested a lot of time in me and I’ve invested a lot of time here,” he says. “It almost felt like there wasn’t a question that I wouldn’t go here.”

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Story by Mike Brothers, Drury’s director of media relations. A version of this story first appeared in the Springfield News-Leader. 

 

 

Gifted summer camps culminate in projects, demos this week

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., July 21, 2014 — Academically gifted students from across the Midwest are once again on the Drury University campus for the summer’s second round of camps aimed specifically at this high-achieving group.

This time around it’s middle- and high-school age students who are in camps organized by Drury’s Center for Gifted Education. Activities for pre-K and elementary school students took place in June.

The camps – called Summerscape for middle schoolers and Drury Leadership Academy (DLA) for high schoolers – allow students to take two weeks of in-depth classes and go hands-on in areas that interest them such as robotics, photography and videography, improv comedy, bio-ethics, world culture and much more. They are considered “pre-college” camps in that students live on campus and participate in activities ranging from games to lectures in the evenings. DLA students can potentially earn college credit for completion.

“The camps not only give this particular group of students the kind of enrichment they crave, but they also provide them with a sense of community and give them a taste of what life is like on a college campus,” says Mary Potthoff, Director of the Center for Gifted Education at Drury.

Summerscape and DLA are now in their second week. Media are invited to cover the camps this week as several performances and demonstrations take place. These include:

Tuesday, July 22

DLA students will compete in an “Iron Chef” style cooking competition as part of class on learning healthy lifestyle habits for college. The contest will take place at 11 a.m. at 1214 N. Summit Ave. Instructor: John Post.

Summerscape students taking a class in aerodynamics will be building model airplane fuselages at 10 a.m. in Lay Hall room 211, and then demonstrate high-pressure water rockets at 11 a.m., at Sunderland Field (green space south of Sunderland Hall). Instructor: Asikaa Cosgrove.

A large service project involving all DLA campers will take place from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Boyd Elementary, 1409 N. Washington Ave., just north of the Drury campus. DLA participants will work on major projects such as installing a track, helping with the remodel of the school library and more. The service project is organized by a group of longtime DLA students returning for a final year of camp following high school graduation.

Wednesday, July 23

DLA students studying slam poetry will hold a poetry slam for the public at 1:30 p.m. at the Park Central Branch Library, 128 Park Central Square downtown. Instructor: Gretchen Teague.

Summerscape students studying Rube Goldberg machines will put together and demonstrate a large device in the zany Goldberg style from 9 a.m. to noon in the lobby of Findlay Student Center. Instructor: Darline Taylor.

Drury has been a national leader in providing education and enrichment programs for academically gifted students more than 30 years. The Drury Center for Gifted Education is the most complete center for gifted education in the state of Missouri and is one of less than 20 complete gifted education centers in the United States. Visit Drury Gifted Education for more information.

Opportunities for coverage are available each day of the camps. For more information on these and other opportunities this week and next week, contact Mary Potthoff at (417) 885-8089 or (417) 873-7386.

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Summer camps for gifted students underway

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., June 18, 2014 — Gifted young students from across the area are keeping their minds in shape over the summer break during camps organized by Drury University’s Center for Gifted Education, in partnership with Springfield Public Schools.

Drury provides a summer experience for gifted students of all ages, from pre-K through the 11th grade. The younger age groups are in camps right now, and the older students’ camps will take place in July. Each summer, more than 700 total students attend these camps.

The current camps (called Summer Pals for ages pre-K through grade 1, and Summer Quest for grades 2 through 5) are taking place from each weekday 8:15 to 11:15 a.m. at Weller Elementary School, 1630 N. Weller Ave. The hands-on, activity-oriented courses feature an array of interesting experiences geared specifically toward gifted students. Summer Quest and Summer Pals give students a chance to interact with peers of similar academic abilities and interests, while encouraging them to use their intellectual and creative sides.

“It gives them a sense of self and a sense of community,” says Mary Potthoff, Director of the Center for Gifted Education at Drury. “And it builds on what they’ve learned in the classroom during the school year, keeping their minds engaged during the summer break.”

Drury has been a national leader in providing education and enrichment programs for academically gifted students more than 30 years. The Drury Center for Gifted Education is the most complete center for gifted education in the state of Missouri, and is one of less than 20 complete gifted education centers in the United States. Visit Drury Gifted Education for more information.

Media are invited to cover the Summer Quest and Summer Pals camps. Some of the more interesting and visually appealing courses include:

Thursday, June 19; I Want To Be A Veterinarian! – A guest speaker will introduce students to therapy dogs and tell students how they can volunteer their time with animals to help others.

Tuesday, June 24 & Friday, June 27; Calling Future Astronauts – Students explore the moon, solar system, black holes and more, as well as the future of NASA’s space exploration programs.

Wednesday, June 25; Magical Science Show – Students use science to perform magic tricks at an open house performance for their parents.

Wednesday, June 25; Polar Bears, Penguins & Seals, Oh My! – Students discover how penguins, seals, walruses, whales and many more Antarctic animals live.

Wednesday, June 25; Dinosaurs Alive! – Students study paleontology. On this day they’ll take a field trip to Riverbluff Cave, which contains findings dated to the Pleistocene in age, the time period that spanned from 1.8 million to 11,000 years ago.

Friday, June 27; Around the World in Eight Days – Students will present all the countries they have “traveled” to and many exciting facts about each.

Opportunities for coverage are available each day of the camps. For more information on these and other opportunities this week and next week, contact Mary Potthoff at (417) 885-8089 or (417) 873-7386.

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