center for community studies

Students present vision for Hazelwood Cemetery ahead of 150th anniversary

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 5, 2017 — A team of Drury architecture students is helping the City of Springfield envision the future of the largest municipally owned cemetery in the state of Missouri.

Hazelwood Cemetery will celebrate its 150th anniversary in October. As part of the city’s celebration of this event, the Springfield Public Works Department asked the Center for Community Studies at Drury’s Hammons School of Architecture to assist in a community-based visioning process to identify a long-term master plan for the cemetery.

The public is invited to a meeting at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 9, at the Schweitzer Brentwood Branch Library to hear recommendations that have resulted from a community input process.

A group of eight third-year architecture students have spent the past several months working closely with city staff and a citizen advisory committee to assess current conditions and challenges, research cultural practices and trends in the funeral industry, and identify the community’s wants and needs. A few of the recommendations that will be discussed are: consideration of a new main entry off Sunset Street, a new cemetery office/maintenance complex, a “Celebration of Life Center,” development of columbarium and sprinkle-gardens, and establishment of a commemorative monument for the cemetery’s 150th anniversary.

The Drury team will use presentation boards, videos, and models to help illustrate these recommendations. The architecture students were supervised by Professor Jay Garrott, director of the Center for Community Studies, with the assistance of Jeff Barber, environmental design state specialist with the University of Missouri-Extension.

The citizen advisory committee and city staff will continue to oversee development of the plan for throughout the summer with the intent of presenting the final vision at the October celebration of the cemetery’s 150th anniversary.

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Media Contact: Jay Garrott, Professor of Architecture & Director of the Center for Community Studies: (417) 873-7371 or jgarrott@drury.edu.

Architecture students to present visions for the future of C-Street site

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 5, 2016 — The Hammons School of Architecture’s Center for Community Studies (CCS) has spent the past four months working with community partners to envision concepts for the long-term redevelopment of The Kitchen, Inc. campus on Commercial Street.

The fourth and final public forum in this process will take place from 7 to 9 p.m., Tuesday, May 10 at the Savoy Ballroom, 224 E. Commercial St. Students and faculty from the CCS will present and discuss potential visions for the 3.5-acre site. Media are invited to attend.

The CCS has worked in collaboration with The Kitchen Inc., Commercial Club, C-Street CID, Landmarks Board, University of Missouri-Extension, City of Springfield Planning and Development, and citizens of Springfield throughout the process.

The intent of this collaborative endeavor was not to identify or choose a specific redevelopment plan for the site. Instead, the process was a way to explore issues associated with the redevelopment of the properties, explore the viability of the various approaches, and invigorate the public discussion of the potential of the properties and surrounding Commercial Street context. Additionally, it serves as a way to document the findings in a graphic and written manner that may be used by the future redevelopment partnership.

The Kitchen is in the process of moving out of its facilities located at the Commercial Street campus and decentralizing its operations throughout the Springfield community. The campus on Commercial Street contains many diverse structures that are important to the physical integrity of the streetscape of Commercial Street, to the historical context of north Springfield, and anchor the important Benton/Commercial intersection at the east gateway to the Commercial Street district. The redevelopment of this large complex is of great importance to The Kitchen Inc., City of Springfield, Commercial Club, C-Street CID, Landmarks Board, and residents of Midtown, Commercial Street, and Woodland Heights neighborhoods.

About the Center for Community Studies

The Center for Community Studies is the interdisciplinary research and academic outreach component of the Hammons School of Architecture. The mission of the center is to assist the regional community in exploring and promoting innovative planning, design and development practices that respond to the challenges of our contemporary and future society and foster a healthier and sustainable habitat for our global community. The Center has worked with more than 60 communities across the region over the last 15 years. Visioning projects inside the City of Springfield have included the West Central Neighborhood Route 66 corridor and a center city housing study.

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Media Contact: Jay Garrott, Professor of Architecture and Director of the Center for Community Studies: (417) 873-7371 or jgarrott@drury.edu

Architecture students help envision future of Kitchen Inc. campus

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Feb. 11, 2016 — The Hammons School of Architecture’s Center for Community Studies (CCS) will lead a visioning exercise this weekend that could help define the future of 3.5 acres of land on Commercial Street currently owned by The Kitchen, Inc.

Students and faculty from the CCS will lead a design charrette to help stakeholders envision conceptual ideas for the renewal of the site. This intensive workshop will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 13 at the Savoy Ballroom, 224 E. Commercial St.

The workshop is open to the public. Partners and stakeholders who will be represented include The Kitchen Inc., the Commercial Club, the Landmarks Board, City of Springfield Planning and Development, and the University of Missouri-Extension. This workshop will lead to further study by Drury architecture students, who will present design possibilities to stakeholders in the coming months.

The Missouri Hotel is the anchor of the redevelopment study. The landmark was designed by local architects Heckenlively & Mark, and originally opened as the Greene Tavern Hotel in April 1930. In addition to the Missouri Hotel, there are seven other buildings on the campus property. With The Kitchen Inc.’s decision to sell its Commercial Street properties and relocate, this section of Commercial Street is now on the market. The property extends from Benton to Jefferson along Commercial Street and south along Jefferson Avenue for a block and a half.

“As the east gateway to the Commercial Street area, this complex of buildings and buildable spaces occupies an important location for the C-Street District and the Springfield community,” says Jay Garrott, professor of architecture and director of the CCS. “The redevelopment of this property represents a potential physical, economic and emotional tipping point for C-Street and all of Midtown. Our goal is to help illuminate the possibilities for both the community and for developers.”

Design Charrette Schedule

10 a.m. – Orientation and tour of the Missouri Hotel and Kitchen Inc. campus

11 a.m.-2 p.m. – Charrette teams work on proposals

2 p.m. – Discussion of ideas with reviewers and larger group

About the Center for Community Studies

The Center for Community Studies is the interdisciplinary research and academic outreach component of the Hammons School of Architecture. The mission of the center is to assist the regional community in exploring and promoting innovative planning, design and development practices that respond to the challenges of our contemporary and future society and foster a healthier and sustainable habitat for our global community. The Center has worked with more than 60 communities across the region over the last 15 years. Visioning projects inside the City of Springfield have included the West Central Neighborhood Route 66 corridor and a center city housing study.

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Media Contacts: Jay G. Garrott, Professor of Architecture: (417) 873-7371 or (417) 818-8289; or Jeff Barber, MU Extension: (417) 343-5682.

Drury architecture students help cities plan their futures

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Dec. 3, 2012 — Every semester, Drury University architecture students put their skills to the test in an applied learning class that engages them with communities throughout Missouri. This semester, Drury’s Center for Community Studies (CCS) is working with three communities in the Ozarks:

  • Springfield. Drury students are working with members of the Rountree neighborhood, Missouri State University, and the City of Springfield to create a visioning document for a section of National Avenue between Cherry and Grand. Students are looking out two and three decades as they identify pros, cons, and recommendations for development along the corridor. Drury students will present their findings to stakeholders on Monday, Dec. 10, 6-8 p.m., at The Madison House on the Missouri State University campus.
  • Bolivar, Mo. Drury students are hoping to build up the city’s reputation as a vibrant economic, social and environmental destination. The Drury team is looking at cosmetic upgrades, such as, façade renewal to Bolivar’s ability to geographically connect with its citizens and with other communities in the region. Students are also exploring issues, such as: identity and branding of the community, sustainable development, and the integration of the arts. Students will make their final presentation to the community on Thursday, Dec. 13, 6-8 p.m., at Main Street Event Center on the southwest corner of the square in Bolivar.
  • Buffalo, Mo. By focusing on physical renewal of the city’s infrastructure, Drury students are hoping to create a more healthy and active lifestyle for the Buffalo community.  Elements of the 20 to 30 year visioning study focuses on parks, trails, sidewalks, after school recreation, biking/pedestrian communities, sustainability, the physical renewal of the city’s architectural infrastructure, identity, branding and connectivity. Drury students will present to the Buffalo community on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 6-8 p.m., at the O’Bannon Community Center in Buffalo.

Once a vision is written for the community, it becomes a “tool kit” that makes implementation easier. Jay Garrott is a Drury architecture professor and the director of the community studio. Garrott says that visions “provide the ability to dream of what could be done to a community, which people seldom have the time to do.”

CCS projects also build a stronger connection between Drury and the communities they help. Tracy Slagle, resource director for the City of Bolivar, is working with the Bolivar project group to help secure a grant for a potential cultural arts center. Slagle’s nephew, John Luce, graduated from Drury’s Architecture program and currently works as an architect. “Rural communities have limited resources,” Slagle said. “When we can partner with universities and get their resources, it accomplishes amazing things.”

On average, Drury CCS only charges the communities it works with the direct cost for materials and travel, while the students provide about 2,700 hours of in-kind architecture and planning work for the communities per semester.

Five communities that the CCS has worked with in the past have received DREAM grants (Downtown Revitalization and Economic Assistance for Missouri (DREAM) Initiative).

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Story by Amber Perdue, a senior public relations and advertising major at Drury.

Drury students help Missouri cities envision their futures

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Dec. 12, 2011 — Drury University architecture students are continuing their work to improve urban and rural development throughout Missouri as a part of Drury University’s Center for Community Studies (CCS). Students meet with their communities several times during the semester and collaborate with the citizens to envision a future, which the students present in a book that they call the “visioning toolkit.”

This semester, Drury students are working in two communities:

  • Kimberling City. In the summer, the city, founded in the early 1970s, is booming with lake activity and vacationers. In the late fall, winter and early spring the population and economic opportunities severely drop. Drury students are working to help the city establish an identity, including a more permanent downtown, as well as encourage more year-round residents.
  • Butler, Mo. Located between Nevada and Kansas City on Highway 71, Butler was known in the 1880s as the “Electric City” because it was the first city west of the Mississippi to have electric power. Now, it’s predominantly a bedroom community for Nevada and Kansas City, but Drury students are hoping to capitalize on the town’s progressive past by making it a hub for transportation and renewable energy. A 13-acre solar farm in the city is already in the works.

Students will present their final proposals on the following dates:

  • Kimberling City—Tuesday, Dec. 13, at 7 p.m., at the Table Rock Gathering Place.
  • Butler—Thursday, Dec. 15, at 6 p.m., at the Butler High School Auditorium.

Even more than downtown revitalization and beautification, CCS projects could help save lives. In the spring of 2009, Drury students worked in Monett, Mo. to organize and develop a plan to alleviate downtown flooding. In the past, Monett’s flooding has caused severe property damage and at least one fatality. In the fall of 2010, Monett was one of five cities to receive a grant from the Downtown Revitalization and Economic Assistance for Missouri (DREAM) Initiative.

Students with Drury's Center for Community Studies worked on Drake Harbor in 2009 in Warsaw. Students envisioned the harbor and the extensive trail system.

According to the Monett Times, “Monett’s application for the fifth round of DREAM combined the Vision 2030 report prepared by the Drury University architecture students with the cooperative venture between the city, the Monett Chamber of Commerce and the downtown merchants in establishing the new position of downtown coordinator, which is now held by DJ Miller.”

Another former Center for Community Studies client, Ozark, also received a DREAM grant in the fall of 2010. That makes five former CCS communities that have directly benefited from the Drury students’ work.

Drury’s CCS works with the Missouri Extension Office to prepare communities before Drury students begin working with communities. After students have completed their projects, MU Extension continues to work with communities in carrying out an action plan. The students’ work is a valuable tool for Missouri cities. CCS only charges around $6,000 for their services, a small fee considering the 2,700 in-kind hours donated by architecture students throughout the semester.

Contact:
Jay Garrott, AIA
Director & Professor, Drury Center for Community Studies
Office: (417) 873-7371
E-mail: jgarrott@drury.edu
Or
Jeff Barber
University of Missouri Extension
Mobile: (417) 343-5682
E-mail: barberj@missouri.edu

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Drury Architecture students help to revitalize Missouri cities

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., April 27, 2011 — Drury University architecture students are continuing their work to improve urban and rural development throughout Missouri as a part of Drury University’s Center for Community Studies (CCS). Students meet with their communities several times during the semester and collaborate with the citizens to envision a future, which the students present in a book, they call the “visioning toolkit.”

Rich Hill, Mo. is located 20 miles north of Nevada, Mo. along Highway 71. Rich Hill, which began with a booming mining industry, is now faced with a dwindling population and little economic activity. Among the projects Drury students will propose are plans to address rising energy costs and new activities to attract youth and create career opportunities.

Students will also address concerns in Stockton, Mo., which is located approximately 60 miles north of Springfield, Mo. Among some of the student proposals for thetown are plans to continue stabilizing the community after severe tornado damage in 2003, reconnect the town’s cultural history and heritage to the local waterways, and develop a stronger retirement community.

Carthage, Mo., located 60 miles west of Springfield, Mo., is also working with the CCS.  The students working with Carthage are proposing projects that will celebrate the community’s rich history while also celebrating the rapidly increasing diversity within the area.

Though proposing different projects for all three towns, students working within Crane, Galena, and Reeds Spring will tackle very similar objectives. Located less than 40 miles south of Springfield, Mo., these communities are closelylinked both by mileage and by needs. Drury students will present ideas thatwill address ways to attract new jobs and cultural activities, emphasize the historic elements of each town, and increase opportunities for new business endeavors.

Central High School, located across the street from Drury, is also receiving suggestions from the CCS.  Facing increasing enrollment, the high school is beginning to outgrow its building and is looking for ways to better address the needs of its community. Students at Drury have been focusing on highlighting fine arts and technical arts, while also incorporating the urban community within their proposals.

Students will present their final proposals on the following dates:

  • Galena—Monday, May 9, at 7 p.m., at the Galena Public Library.
  • Stockton—Monday, May 2, at 7 p.m., at the Stockton Community Center.
  • Reeds Spring—Tuesday, May 10, at 6:30 p.m., at the Reeds Spring High School in the library.
  • Rich Hill—Tuesday, May 10, at 7 p.m., at Rich Hill High School.
  • Central High School—Wednesday, May 11, at 3 p.m., in the choral room.
  • Carthage—Monday, May 9, at 7 p.m. at the Memorial Hall.
  • Crane—Thursday, May 12, at 7 p.m. at Crane High School

The students will rehearse their presentations for the architecture faculty on Monday, May 2, 2011 and Wednesday May 4, 2011 from 1-5 p.m. in the Hammons School of Architecture.

Even more than downtown revitalization and beautification, CCS projects could help save lives. In the spring of 2009, Drury students worked in Monett, Mo. to organize and develop a plan to alleviate downtown flooding. In the past, Monett’s flooding has caused severe property damage and at least one fatality. This fall, Monett was one of five cities to receive a grant from the Downtown Revitalization and Economic Assistance for Missouri (DREAM) Initiative.

According to the Monett Times, “Monett’s application for the fifth round of DREAM combined the Vision 2030 report prepared by the Drury University architecture students with the cooperative venture between the city, the Monett Chamber of Commerce and the downtown merchants in establishing the new position of downtown coordinator, which is now held by DJ Miller.”

Another former Center for Community Studies client, Ozark, also received a DREAM grant in the fall of 2010. That makes five former CCS communities that have directlybenefited from the Drury students’ work.

Drury’s CCS works with the Missouri Extension Office to prepare communities before Drury students begin working with communities. After students have completed their projects, MU Extension continues to work with communities in carrying out an action plan. The students’ work is a valuable tool for Missouri cities. CCS only charges around $6,000 for their services, a small fee considering the 2,700 in-kind hours donated by architecture students throughout the semester.

Contact:
Jay Garrott, AIA
Director & Professor, Drury Center for Community Studies
Office: (417) 873-7371
E-mail
: jgarrott@drury.edu
Or
Jeff Barber
University of Missouri Extension
Mobile: (417) 343-5682
E-mail:
barberj@missouri.edu

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