career planning and development

“Ecopreneurship” Event Highlights Career Choices in Sustainability

Local high school and college students are encouraged to learn about the expanding and increasingly important field of environmental sustainability at the 4th Annual Ecopreneurship Panel and Career Fair Wednesday, Feb. 19, at Drury University.

The free event begins with a career fair from 4-6 p.m. at the Trustee Science Center. Students can visit with representatives from more than a dozen not-for-profit organizations, businesses, and government agencies about volunteer, internship and job opportunities, and explore various ways that an environmental education can lead to various careers.

Appetizers from Metro Farmer restaurant and pizza will be provided starting at 5:30 p.m. Wendy Anderson, Environmental Science Professor at Drury, will offer opening remarks at 6 p.m., followed by panel presentations and a discussion with Barbara Lucks and Daniela Liscio. Lucks is the Sustainability Officer for the City of Springfield. Liscio is a former attorney who changed careers and began a nutritional consulting business called Eat for Sport.

Co-sponsored by the Edward Jones Center for Entrepreneurship and the Environmental Sciences Department at Drury, the annual event spotlights the nexus of a several trends in the job market and global community.

“Most of the innovations needed to solve our most pressing environmental problems will emerge from people with the interdisciplinary skill sets,” Anderson says. “Environmental education at Drury is deeply interdisciplinary and committed to community engagement. We ensure that our students develop critical thinking skills based on broad understandings of ethics, economics, management, politics, laws, psychology, and the natural sciences.”

Employers are increasingly adding positions that focus on sustainability to their staffs, says Kelley Still, Director of the Edward Jones Center for Entrepreneurship.

“Yet even with the increased corporate opportunities, some students will find it necessary to start their own businesses to have the impact they desire,” Still says. “That’s the reason we hold this joint venture between Environmental Sciences and the Edward Jones Center. We want to empower them to choose that path.”

For more information, contact: Kelley Still, Director of the Edward Jones Center for Entrepreneurship, at (417) 873-7458 or kstill@drury.edu; or Wendy Anderson, Professor of Biology and Environmental Science, at (417) 873-7445 or wanderso@drury.edu.

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2012 Drury graduates found jobs and went to graduate school soon after graduation

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., August 15, 2013 — More than 96 percent of 2012 graduates from Drury University’s traditional Day School, who responded to a university survey, are employed or furthering their education according to an annual study conducted by Drury University’s Office of Career Planning and Development.

Drury graduation

The study measures the status of traditional undergraduates six months after graduation who received bachelor’s degrees in December 2011, May 2012 and August 2012. Drury received information on 242 out of a possible 320 graduates for a response rate of more than 75 percent. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, the average national response rate for the Class of 2010 was just 60.8 percent.

In the latest Drury survey, 234 respondents were found to be either working, in graduate school or working while in graduate school for a placement rate of 96.7 percent. Another 2.1 percent of students took a gap year or were not looking.

“According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate in 2011 for students with a bachelor’s degree was just 4.9 percent, nearly three points lower than the national average,” said Jill Wiggins, director of Career Planning and Development at Drury. “When you combine that with average lifetime earnings for bachelor’s degree holders versus non-graduates, it’s easy to say, ‘Yes, college is worth it.’ ”

Drury students furthering their education in graduate or professional schools are attending more than 50 different institutions, including: the St. Louis University School of Law, the University of Chicago, Washington University, the University of Denver and Vanderbilt University.

Media Contact: Jill Wiggins, MBA, Drury’s Director of Career Planning and Development, Office: (417) 873-6980, Email: jillwiggins@drury.edu

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Drury students are finding jobs and entering graduate school in the recovering economy

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., June 26, 2012 — More than 99 percent of 2011 graduates from Drury University’s traditional Day School, who responded to a university survey, are employed or furthering their education, according to an annual study conducted by Drury’s Office of Career Planning and Development.

The study measures the status of traditional undergraduates six months after graduation who received bachelor’s degrees in December 2010, May 2011 and August 2011. Drury received information on 235 out of a possible 312 graduates for a response rate of more than 75 percent. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, the average national response rate for the Class of 2010 was just 60.8 percent.

In the latest Drury survey, 233 respondents were found to be either working, in graduate school or working while in graduate school for a placement rate of 99.15 percent.

“These numbers help to answer the question, ‘Is college worth it?’” said Jill Wiggins, director of Career Planning and Development at Drury. “When the unemployment rate for people with an undergraduate degree is half of the national average, the answer clearly is, yes, college is worth it.”

Jill Wiggins, Director of Career Planning and Development

Over the past nine years, Drury’s placement rate, for those who responded to the survey, has averaged 97.3 percent, and the response rate to the annual survey has averaged 71.6 percent.

Drury students furthering their education in graduate or professional schools are attending 40 different institutions, including: the St. Louis University School of Medicine, New York University, Washington University and the University of Pennsylvania.

Two success stories from the Drury class of 2011:

Josh Loya graduated from Drury in May 2011, and he has been working at Intuitive Web Solutions in Springfield since September of 2011. Loya thought about graduate school, but decided to wait, and used skills he learned in interviewing and resumé writing to land the first job for which he applied. “I definitely think that helped. I did practice interviews, went over my resumé with Career Planning and Development, and I took a class on career and life planning my senior year. So I was able to have a good interview and get the job,” Loya said.

Danielle McCallum graduated with a bachelor’s in advertising and public relations in May 2011, and she immediately began Drury’s one-year Master of Arts in Communication program while working full-time in Drury’s financial aid department. Before she finished graduate school in May 2012, Twin Oaks Country Club in Springfield hired McCallum to be the media and accounting coordinator, “I believe college is worth the cost. Although I had to take out student loans to make it this far, the debt I incurred was manageable and led me to a great new job.”

Media Contact: Jill Wiggins, MBA, SPHR, Director of Career Planning and Development, Office: (417) 873-7284, E-mail: jillwiggins@drury.edu

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Drury community jobs fair brings employers to campus on Tuesday, Oct. 18

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Oct. 13, 2011 — Missouri Congressman Billy Long is the Honorary Event Chairman for a jobs fair at Drury University on Tuesday, Oct. 18. The event in the Findlay Student Center Ballroom will run from 1-4 p.m. The event is open to the public.

More than 30 employers will be in attendance from all over Missouri, including: Edward Jones, Regions Bank and United Healthcare.

“We are excited about the wide variety of employers we have confirmed for the October 18 event,” says Jill Wiggins, director of career planning and development at Drury. “Some of the organizations represented are trying to fill openings that require a high school education, while others have positions that require a bachelor’s degree or higher. A person with any level of education and experience could potentially find a job at this event.”

The Findlay Student Center is located on the northeast side of the Drury University campus at the corner of Webster and Summit Streets. Go to http://www.drury.edu/vtour/ to view a map of campus. Parking is available in Lot 7.

For questions, call the Drury Department of Career Planning and Development at (417) 873-7284.

Media Contact for Drury University: Mark Miller, M.A., Associate Director of Marketing and Communications, Office: (417) 873-7390, Mobile: (417) 839-2886, E-mail: markmiller@drury.edu

Media Contact for Rep. Billy Long: Bret Funk, Communications Director, Office: (202) 225-6536, E-mail: bret.funk@mail.house.gov

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