art

“We are the Pigeons” student exhibition documents Italian refugee crisis

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Nov. 2, 2017 — The photography exhibition “We are the Pigeons: The Italian Refugee Crisis” opens at the Drury on C-Street Art Gallery with a reception from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 3.

This month’s exhibition is the work of Drury senior Bre Legan and features a collection of photographs she captured during her study abroad trip to Florence, Italy. The project focuses on Legan’s encounters with refugees living in the city.

“Pigeons are closely related to doves, but are viewed as vermin,” Legan says. In a conversation with one of Florence’s many African refugees, she discovered that this is the way that many of the displaced men and women living in Italy feel about themselves.

“My brothers and sisters here, we are the pigeons,” one man told her in a conversation that sparked the project.

Touched by this event, Legan spent the rest of her time in Florence trying to better understand the city’s community of refugees, immigrants, and asylum seekers. “We are the Pigeons” documents their experience through the lens of Legan’s camera.

Gallery attendees can expect to see a variety of photographs featuring the architecture, people, and birds of Florence. Each piece is accompanied by a written narrative that provides context and ties the images together.

The exhibition runs through November 24. Drury’s C-Street gallery is open Monday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Friday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

For more information, call (417) 873-6337 or visit Drury on C-Street’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/DruryCStreet.

About Drury on C-Street

The Drury on C-Street Project is an initiative by Drury University, in partnership with other local organizations, to establish a Drury Center on Commercial Street. This center includes an art gallery, a business resource center, and the weaving studio. The Drury on C-Street Gallery is a professional, student-run gallery featuring emerging and established artists. Drury University’s Drury on C-Street Gallery provides arts administration majors the experience of promoting the work of local artists. The gallery connects the community to new and relevant art in an accessible and welcoming environment.

C-Street Gallery opens “Study Abroad: The Student View” exhibit Friday

“Through the Aventine Keyhole” by Jessica Rockafellow, taken in Rome.

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Oct. 4, 2017 — The photography exhibition “Study Abroad: The Student View” opens Friday at the Drury on C-Street Art Gallery with a reception from 5-8 p.m.

This marks the second installment of what has become an annual exhibition featuring photographs taken by Drury students who have studied abroad over the past academic year. This year’s gallery represents 16 different students bringing photographs from around the world.

The gallery will be open throughout the month of October and all student prints on display will be available for purchase through silent auction. Bids start at $15 and proceeds from the auction go to study abroad scholarships.

The Drury on C-Street Gallery is also hosting Enactus students who are raising money to support the Woman’s Skill Training Center at the Tribal School of the Hem Sheela Model School in Durgapur, India. A wide variety of beautiful items created by women in the training center will be available for purchase during the exhibition’s opening reception.

Untitled photo by Hannah Ogden, taken in Switzerland.

Gallery viewing hours after the reception will be 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Fridays, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays. The gallery will be closed during Drury’s Fall Break, October 19 to 22.

For more information, call (417) 873-6337 or visit Drury on C-Street’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/DruryCStreet.

About Drury on C-Street

The Drury on C-Street Project is an initiative by Drury University, in partnership with other local organizations, to establish a Drury Center on Commercial Street. This center includes an art gallery, a business resource center, and the weaving studio. The Drury on C-Street Gallery is a professional, student-run gallery featuring emerging and established artists. Drury University’s Drury on C-Street Gallery provides arts administration majors the experience of promoting the work of local artists. The gallery connects the community to new and relevant art in an accessible and welcoming environment.

###

Randy Bacon exhibit reveals dignity of the homeless through photography

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Aug. 30, 2017 — Springfield photographer Randy Bacon brings his eye for revealing his subjects’ character to the Pool Art Center Gallery at Drury University during September. His exhibit, “The Road I Call Home,” will open with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m., Friday, Sept. 1. Bacon will speak at 5:30 p.m.

“Pops and Gizmo,” portrait by Randy Bacon

Bacon has photographed thousands of people over his career, propelled by his commitment as a portrait artist to capture the miracle of each person – the ‘ones’ of this planet of over 7 billion. No matter the walk of life, Bacon strives to present each ‘one’ in a very true, raw, real, and no-frills manner. “The Road I Call Home” is an exploration of homelessness and a direct extension of Bacon’s mission. The portraits reveal the subjects’ importance and special qualities with dignity by avoiding the stereotypical attitudes and perceptions that society commonly has of the homeless.

Viewing hours at the Pool Art Center Gallery are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursdays. The Pool Art Center is located on Clay Avenue, just north of Central Street.

###

C-Street Gallery opens “Representing Reality” exhibit April 7

SPRINGFIELD, MO., April 7, 2017 – “Representing Reality” opens at the Drury on C-Street Gallery with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m. this evening. The exhibition will focus on work that encapsulates the idea of representation, and will feature pieces by various artists and their interpretation of diversity of experience. The Drury on C-Street Gallery is located at 233 E. Commercial Street. The opening reception is free to the public with food provided by Café Cusco.

“Representing Reality” was conceptualized by Arts Administration students Tori Manisco and Madison Morgan.

“There is a serious lack of diversity in mainstream media and too often a huge part of our population is left feeling under represented,” Manisco says. “Yet, when suddenly there is someone with whom you identify, who represents your struggle or your experience, it can be the most liberating feeling.”

“Creating and maintaining diversity in mainstream media is an invitation to be included in a narrative you never thought you could be a part of – it humanizes our differences,” Morgan says. “When we share and listen to stories that recount our respective struggles, we are granted the opportunity to broaden our outlook on life and form a more inclusive society.”

This exhibition will run from April 7 through 31. Gallery viewing hours after the opening reception will be 11-2pm on Mondays, 11-12:30pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1-2pm on Wednesdays, 11-1pm on Fridays, and on Saturdays from 10-2pm.

For more information, call (417) 873-6337 or visit Drury on C-Street’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/DruryCStreet.

About Drury on C-Street

The Drury on C-Street Project is an initiative by Drury University, in partnership with other local

organizations, to establish a Drury Center on Commercial Street. This center includes an art gallery, a business resource center, and the weaving studio. The Drury on C-Street Gallery is a professional, student-run gallery featuring emerging and established artists. Drury University’s Drury on C-Street Gallery provides arts administration majors the experience of promoting the work of local artists. The gallery connects the community to new and relevant art in an accessible and welcoming environment.

###

Media Contact: Rebecca Miller, Director of Arts Administration: (417) 873-6337 or rmiller01@drury.edu.

C-Street Gallery opens “Meme-Ography” exhibit on Friday

SPRINGFIELD, MO., Feb. 27, 2017 – An art exhibition focusing on Internet culture of the past decade will open at the Drury on C-Street Gallery on Friday, March 3 with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m. “Meme-Ography” will feature artistic interpretations of some of the Internet’s most notable memes, a community engagement meme board, and a timeline of Internet phenomena from 2007-2017. The Drury on C-Street Gallery is located at 233 E. Commercial Street. The opening reception is free to the public with food provided by Café Cusco.

kermit-meme

The Internet has been a growing presence in our daily lives for years, and as a result has cultivated its own unique cultural influence. The result is a society in which memes have become not just a form of entertainment and comedic expression, but also a statement of our opinion as a society on what counts as art, from what can be used to make a statement on topics as mundane as the “Thanksgiving Clapback” to more pressing topics like the United States political climate.

“Meme-Ography” was conceptualized by Arts Administration students Hannah Beckmann and Tulley Beard.

This exhibition will run from March 3 through 24. Gallery viewing hours after the opening reception will be 11 to 2 p.m. on Mondays, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1 to 2 p.m. on Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Fridays, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays.

For more information, call (417) 873-6337 or visit Drury on C-Street’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/DruryCStreet.

About Drury on C-Street

The Drury on C-Street Project is an initiative by Drury University, in partnership with other local organizations, to establish a Drury Center on Commercial Street. This center includes an art gallery, a business resource center, and the weaving studio. The Drury on C-Street Gallery is a professional, student-run gallery featuring emerging and established artists. Drury University’s Drury on C-Street Gallery provides arts administration majors the experience of promoting the work of local artists. The gallery connects the community to new and relevant art in an accessible and welcoming environment.

###

Events explore lessons from WWII-era Japanese-American internment camps

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., January 31, 2017 — A multi-disciplinary series of events and performances at Drury University will tell the story of the internment camps set up by the U.S. government to hold Japanese-Americans during World War II. The camps were result of President Franklin Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066 signed in the weeks after the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.

Chikaraishi

Chikaraishi

“Life Interrupted: Art for Social Change” is a project that brings together the arts, humanities, history and political science departments at Drury, along with the greater Springfield community and the CORE Performance Company, to hear about the camps and ask what we can learn from the experience.

How have these same issues of civil rights violations, racial profiling, discrimination, immigration and xenophobia shifted, changed, or stayed the same? How do we ensure the safety of our country without discriminating against ethnic and religious minorities?

“It’s 75 years past and we’re still grappling with the same issues – fear of people we don’t know, fear of people who look different from us,” says Nancy Chikaraishi, a Drury architecture professor whose parents and grandparents were forced into the camps, and who is the lead organizer for the series of “Life Interrupted” events at Drury.

MORE: Read an interview with Chikaraishi about her personal connection to the internment camps and how she became involved in the “Life Interrupted” project.

The events begin on Thursday with a roundtable discussion with community leaders, followed by a dance workshop and art installation on Friday and a performance on Saturday of “Life Interrupted” by CORE, which is based in Atlanta and Houston. A final panel discussion on the nature of architecture and power will be held next week.

Full list of events:

Thursday, Feb. 2, 6 p.m. – Roundtable discussion with local community leaders led by Drury political science professors Dr. Daniel Ponder and Dr. Jeff Vandenberg, with representatives from the Islamic Society of Joplin, NAACP, Temple Israel, and PROMO. Location: Reed Auditorium, Trustee Science Center on the Drury campus.

Friday Feb. 3, 3-4:30 p.m. – Dance workshop and story circle with the CORE Performance Company. Participants will be guided through the story circle process, sharing personal stories related to the themes investigated in “Life Interrupted.” No previous dance experience is required. Participants are encouraged to wear clothing that will not inhibit moving freely. Location: Drury on C-Street Gallery, 233 E. Commercial Street.

Friday, Feb. 3, 5-8 p.m. – Interactive art installation & exhibition opening led by Nancy Chikaraishi and Drury students (following the dance workshop and story circle). Location: Drury on C-Street Gallery, 233 E. Commercial Street.

Saturday, Feb. 4, 7:30 p.m. – “Life Interrupted” dance theatrical performance by the CORE Performance Company. Reserve tickets for free online. Location: Wilhoit Theater, Breech School of Business, corner of Central Street and Drury Lane.

Tuesday, Feb. 7, 6-7:30 p.m. – Panel Discussion on Architecture & Power, led by Drury architecture professors Dr. Robert Weddle, Dr. Panos Leventis and Nancy Chikaraishi. Location: Drury on C-Street Gallery, 233 E. Commercial Street.

This project is supported in part by awards from the Mid-America Arts Alliance, National Endowment for the Arts, Missouri Arts Council, and foundations, corporations and individuals throughout Arkansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Texas, Springfield Regional Arts Council and Community Foundation of the Ozarks, DoubleTree by Hilton, Nelson and Kelley Still Nichols, Colorgraphic Printing, Drury University, Drury University’s Hammons School of Architecture and the L.E. Meador Center for Politics and Citizenship.

###

Media Contact: Nancy Chikaraishi, Professor of Architecture: (417) 873-7459 or nchikaraishi@drury.edu.

The Beauty of Studying Abroad

Story by Jessie Roller 

A recent exhibit at the Drury University art gallery on Commercial Street celebrated Drury’s study abroad programs and the beauty students found in their experiences.

“Study Abroad: The Student View” featured photos that gave an inside look at the different study abroad experiences of more than a dozen Drury students. Students who study abroad say they learn about other people and cultures, but also frequently say they learn about themselves, too. About 40 percent of all Drury undergraduates study abroad during their college career.

“Aphrodite,” Aphrodite, Cyprus 2016, by Mohannad Almazroa.

“Aphrodite” – photo by Mohannad Almazroa taken in Cyprus, 2016.

Kashif Masoud, an architecture major, was heavily influenced by the rich history of the places he traveled to during his study abroad experience. Being able to experience the history that he had read about in the cities where it had occurred gave him a stronger sense of what it would have been like to live through.

“In some cases it was an eye opening experience to learn about the skill and workmanship of those times and in other cases it was a realization of how humans have developed and advanced their way of life,” he says.

Kashif’s three photos tell the stories of the places he traveled, really capturing the essence and history of these places, as well as observing their architectural importance and beauty.

“They shed light on the value of a study abroad trip that opens one’s minds to great works of architecture that have influenced the world,” he said.

"Boathouse" - photo by Kashif Masoud taken in Italy

“Boathouse” – photo by Kashif Masoud taken in Italy, 2016.

Trevor Cobb, a Spanish major, traveled to Ecuador last summer to experience Latin and South American culture first hand, rather than just learning about the culture from books, in a classroom. Living within a different culture had him constantly learning and adapting to new ways of life.

“Nothing ever felt boring or old,” he says.

He said that even the everyday things, like going to class or to a café, were exciting simply because he was on a different continent. Cobb’s photos reflect the different experiences and moods of his experience in Ecuador. They also include the people that made his trip even more memorable.

"Deer" - photo by Claire Lennard taken in Glencoe, Scottish Highlands, 2016.

“Deer” – photo by Claire Lennard taken in Glencoe, Scottish Highlands, 2016.

“One of the most surprising things about the trip is how close I got to the other students from Drury that I went on the trip with,” he says. “I expected to gain new knowledge and discover another culture, but I didn’t expect to make such great friends that I would keep at Drury. The photos of people helped me to capture memories that I can share with my peers.”

Ultimately, study abroad experiences are meant to broaden one’s perspective on the wider world. That is exactly what architecture major Yasmeen Al Tamimi (an international student from Kuwait) says her travels – and her photographs – are all about.

“My photos illustrate the wonderful things in this world,” she says. “It is to show that there is so much more to see.”

“History’s Imprint on Today” - photo by Karis Kononiuk, taken in Northern Ireland 2016.

“History’s Imprint on Today” – photo by Karis Kononiuk, taken in Northern Ireland 2016.

###

C-Street Gallery opens “Flores do Verão” on Friday

SPRINGFIELD, MO., Oct. 31, 2016 – “Flores do Verão” is a solo exhibition opening at the Drury on C-Street Gallery on Friday, November 4 with a reception from 4 to 7 p.m. Featured artist Matt Edwards depicts flowers and trees in order to give viewers a sense of calm and warmness. The Drury on C-Street Gallery is located at 233 E. Commercial Street. The opening reception is free to the public with live entertainment provided by the Drury Jazz Ensemble.

"High Noon" - painting by Matt Edwards

“High Noon” – painting by Matt Edwards

The title “Flores do Verão” is a reference to the Portuguese influence on Edwards. The use of flowers and trees form compositions that challenge Edwards’ palette, but gives a sense of the beauty of the world surrounding us all. Some of his latest work is derived from Portuguese azulejos – vibrant ceramic tiles used to build geometric patterns.

This exhibition will run from November 4 through 26. Gallery viewing hours after the opening reception will be 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Fridays, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays.

For more information, call (417) 873-6359 or visit Drury on C-Street’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/DruryCStreet.

###

C-Street Gallery opens “Study Abroad: The Student View” exhibit Friday

SPRINGFIELD, MO., Oct. 4, 2016 – Photo exhibition “Study Abroad: The Student View” opens at the Drury on C-Street Gallery with a reception from 4 to 7 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 7.

The exhibition features photographs by Drury students who have studied abroad during the past year with a Drury or affiliated program. The Drury on C-Street Gallery is located at 233 E. Commercial Street. The opening reception is free to the public with refreshments provided by Café Cusco.

“History’s Imprint on Today,” Northern Ireland 2016, by Karis Kononiuk

“History’s Imprint on Today,” Northern Ireland 2016, by Karis Kononiuk

The photographs in the exhibition represent a unique moment during each student’s study abroad experience from their international travels to Cyprus, Ecuador, Greece, France, Italy, Northern Ireland, Scotland, or Switzerland. Some of the photographs will be included in a silent auction during the month to raise funds for study abroad scholarships.

Study abroad experiences are a key component of a Drury education, and it is a requirement in some degree programs such as business and architecture. More than 40 percent of Drury undergraduates study aborad at some point in their college careers, which is far above the national average of about 10 percent.

“Aphrodite,” Aphrodite, Cyprus 2016, by Mohannad Almazroa.

“Aphrodite,” Aphrodite, Cyprus 2016, by Mohannad Almazroa.

This exhibition will run from Oct. 7 through 28. Gallery viewing hours after the opening reception will be 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Fridays, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, October 8, October 22 and October 29.

For more information, call (417) 873-6359 or visit Drury on C-Street’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/DruryCStreet.

Exhibit shines spotlight on “outsider” artists from the Ozarks

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Sept. 29, 2016 — Drury University’s Pool Art Center Gallery will host the exhibition “Ozark Outsiders” October 7 through 28. The show features eight regional artists known for works that fall outside the confines of the traditional art world, and who were largely untrained. The show’s curator is Patricia Watts, who moved to Springfield in 2013 after living in California for 32 years. Her family settled in the Ozarks in Webster County in the early 1800s, where she spent her summers growing up in the 1960s-80s, with a regional appreciation for self-directed creativity.

The term “outsider” can be off-putting to some in the art world, and determining if an artist is an outsider depends on a number of traits and conditions, including the artist’s motivations, skill set, and training.

“One of the more difficult ways to assess this work is to make a judgment on the level of authenticity of expression,” says Watts, the curator. “This begs the question: can a pure form of creativity be taught in art schools? Is a naive approach more pure than having the technical skills and access to art-making materials?”

The Ozark Outsiders exhibit includes artists who, whether for reasons of mental health, physical disabilities, or because they simply like to use the visual arts as a medium of expression, ultimately made their art for themselves. The featured artists include:

James Edward Deeds, Jr. (1908-1987) was raised in Christian County and was confined at the Missouri State Hospital No. 3 in Nevada for most of his life. While there, he made hundreds of drawings. His “electric pencil drawings” were first shown in 2014 at Art Inspired in Springfield, where artists with disabilities explore their creativity through art activities.

Joseph Elmer Yoakum (1889-1972) grew up in Ash Grove and made hundreds of animated landscape drawings after an emotional breakdown while living near Chicago in the 1960s. Yoakum has yet to be given his due locally, even though he was featured in a solo show at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City one month prior to his death.

"Ozark Mts. St. Jeneeveive Mo" by Joseph Elmer Yoakum

“Ozark Mts. St. Jeneeveive Mo” by Joseph Elmer Yoakum. Pen, pencil, and watercolor on paper. Image courtesy of Carl Hammer Gallery in Chicago.

Robert E. Smith (1927-2010) lived in Springfield for 40 years and is well known to the regional art community for his childlike mappings painted on canvas, often accompanied with a letter and/or a cassette tape. His work is portrayed in a large mural downtown at the corner of Campbell and Walnut streets.

Ralph Doss Lanning (1916-2009) was born and raised in Greene County, and also is well known in the local art community. His outdoor sculpture garden of cement and carved limestone figures was previously located in a roadside setting along Highway 70 in Republic.

Lucille Stoll (born 1922) is one of three included artists still living. Born at home in Christian County, she has lived off of Highway Z all of her adult life, painting landscapes in oils. After a stroke at age 73, she returned exclusively to her childhood expression of making drawings with pencil on paper. She is self-taught and has not previously shown her work in an academic art venue.

Tim West (1938-2012), from Winslow, Arkansas, is the only artist in the exhibition who was formally trained, but due to family problems and his desire to live “off the grid” in the woods, his art became more informed by visions of his mental states rather than his exposure to an arts education.

Sammy Landers (born 1957) lives in a group home in Arkadelphia, Arkansas, where he has resided since the early 1980s. He is autistic and a self-taught artist who uses his art as a means of visual expression to communicate daily life events. He draws human figures, plants, and buildings using markers, pens, and crayons on paper.

Ed Stilley (born 1930) is a preacher from Hogscald Hollow in northwest Arkansas. In his mid-50s, he says he was told by God to make guitars from scrap wood and give them away for free to children. By 2005, he had crafted more than 200 instruments with Biblical verses carved and painted on them. Springfield photographer Tim Hawley recently published a book on Stilley titled Gifted, which helped put the artist on the “outsider” map.

 

About the Curators

Patricia Watts is Consulting Curator for the Marin Community Foundation in Northern California, since 2012, where she organizes large monographic exhibitions of under recognized mature artists. She was formerly Chief Curator at the Sonoma County Museum in Santa Rosa. Watts feels that the Ozarks are rich with independent, creative people who are waiting to be discovered. Learn more about her endeavors at wattsartadvisory.com.

Assistant Curator Kate Tuthill graduated summa cum laude from Dartmouth College with a B.A. in Art History, focused on modern and contemporary art. A Northern California native, Tuthill has worked in the New York art world at: the Whitney Museum of American Art; The Museum of Modern Art; Christie’s; and Gagosian Gallery. She relocated to Springfield with her husband in 2014, and serves as board member for Sculpture Walk Springfield and docent for Springfield Art Museum.

###

Media Contact: Patricia Watts, Curator: (310) 704-2395 or patricia@wattsartadvisory.com.