architecture

Drury students help Missouri cities envision their futures

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Dec. 12, 2011 — Drury University architecture students are continuing their work to improve urban and rural development throughout Missouri as a part of Drury University’s Center for Community Studies (CCS). Students meet with their communities several times during the semester and collaborate with the citizens to envision a future, which the students present in a book that they call the “visioning toolkit.”

This semester, Drury students are working in two communities:

  • Kimberling City. In the summer, the city, founded in the early 1970s, is booming with lake activity and vacationers. In the late fall, winter and early spring the population and economic opportunities severely drop. Drury students are working to help the city establish an identity, including a more permanent downtown, as well as encourage more year-round residents.
  • Butler, Mo. Located between Nevada and Kansas City on Highway 71, Butler was known in the 1880s as the “Electric City” because it was the first city west of the Mississippi to have electric power. Now, it’s predominantly a bedroom community for Nevada and Kansas City, but Drury students are hoping to capitalize on the town’s progressive past by making it a hub for transportation and renewable energy. A 13-acre solar farm in the city is already in the works.

Students will present their final proposals on the following dates:

  • Kimberling City—Tuesday, Dec. 13, at 7 p.m., at the Table Rock Gathering Place.
  • Butler—Thursday, Dec. 15, at 6 p.m., at the Butler High School Auditorium.

Even more than downtown revitalization and beautification, CCS projects could help save lives. In the spring of 2009, Drury students worked in Monett, Mo. to organize and develop a plan to alleviate downtown flooding. In the past, Monett’s flooding has caused severe property damage and at least one fatality. In the fall of 2010, Monett was one of five cities to receive a grant from the Downtown Revitalization and Economic Assistance for Missouri (DREAM) Initiative.

Students with Drury's Center for Community Studies worked on Drake Harbor in 2009 in Warsaw. Students envisioned the harbor and the extensive trail system.

According to the Monett Times, “Monett’s application for the fifth round of DREAM combined the Vision 2030 report prepared by the Drury University architecture students with the cooperative venture between the city, the Monett Chamber of Commerce and the downtown merchants in establishing the new position of downtown coordinator, which is now held by DJ Miller.”

Another former Center for Community Studies client, Ozark, also received a DREAM grant in the fall of 2010. That makes five former CCS communities that have directly benefited from the Drury students’ work.

Drury’s CCS works with the Missouri Extension Office to prepare communities before Drury students begin working with communities. After students have completed their projects, MU Extension continues to work with communities in carrying out an action plan. The students’ work is a valuable tool for Missouri cities. CCS only charges around $6,000 for their services, a small fee considering the 2,700 in-kind hours donated by architecture students throughout the semester.

Contact:
Jay Garrott, AIA
Director & Professor, Drury Center for Community Studies
Office: (417) 873-7371
E-mail: jgarrott@drury.edu
Or
Jeff Barber
University of Missouri Extension
Mobile: (417) 343-5682
E-mail: barberj@missouri.edu

###

Drury’s Extreme Makeover efforts earn media attention

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Oct. 27, 2011 — For the past week,  Drury University students, faculty and staff have helped ABC’s Extreme Makeover Home Edition (EMHE) help transform tornado ravaged Joplin. Drury Architecture Professor Traci Sooter headed up a team of students to design and create a landscape feature that is a tribute to the more than 100,000 volunteers who helped Joplin rebuild after the May 22 tornado.

Drury students lay sod at the Joplin Volunteer Tribute

This effort has earned Drury media coverage in Joplin:

Extreme Home Makeover Home Edition built seven houses in seven days for seven families that lost their homes on May 22. Drury has granted $25,000 scholarships to the 14 children under the age of 18 who live in those homes. Also, Drury has pledged a $1,000 scholarship to any 2012 high school graduate living in the Joplin School District. The graduate can be a public school, private school or a home school student. The scholarship is contingent upon the student being admissible to Drury University.

###

Professor’s research comes from the aqueducts of Rome to the faucets at Drury

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Oct. 26, 2011 — Katherine Rinne, a professor at the California College of the Arts, will speak on Oct. 28 in the Hammons School of Architecture multi-purpose room at 1 p.m. Her speech, Pluming Rome, is a part of Drury University’s Architecture Lecture Series 2011-12. This lecture is free and open to the public.

Katherine Rinne

Rinne will present her research examining the 3,000-year history of water infrastructure and the development of Rome. She has received many awards from the National Gallery of Art and the National Science Foundation. Her book, The Waters of Rome: Aqueducts, Fountains and the Birth of the Baroque City, was awarded the 2011 John Brinkerhoff Jackson Award for Landscape History.

Aside from her research and book, Rinne is also the project director for “Aquae Urbis Romae: The Waters of the City of Rome,” a web-based research project published by the University of Virginia.

For more information about the project, visit the website at: http://www3.iath.virginia.edu/waters/

###

Professor’s research comes from the aqueducts of Rome to the faucets at Drury

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Oct. 26, 2011 — Katherine Rinne, a professor at the California College of the Arts, will speak on Oct. 28 in the Hammons School of Architecture multi-purpose room at 1 p.m. Her speech, Pluming Rome, is a part of Drury University’s Architecture Lecture Series 2011-12. This lecture is free and open to the public.

Rinne will present her research examining the 3,000-year history of water infrastructure and the development of Rome. She has received many awards from the National Gallery of Art and the National Science Foundation. Her book, The Waters of Rome: Aqueducts, Fountains and the Birth of the Baroque City, was awarded the 2011 John Brinkerhoff Jackson Award for Landscape History.

Aside from her research and book, Rinne is also the project director for “Aquae Urbis Romae: The Waters of the City of Rome,” a web-based research project published by the University of Virginia.

For more information about the project, visit the website at: http://www3.iath.virginia.edu/waters/

###

Drury to participate in its fourth build with ABC’s Extreme Makeover Home Edition

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Oct. 19, 2011 — As ABC’s Extreme Makeover Home Edition brings its army of builders, renovators and cameras to Joplin on Oct. 19, Drury students, faculty and staff are part of the crew that will help the city rebuild after it was ravaged by a deadly tornado on May 22. Extreme Makeover Home Edition will work in Joplin Oct. 19-25.

“This is a great experience for our students and the Drury community to be a part of something larger than them,” said Traci Sooter, Drury architecture professor and organizer for Drury’s Extreme Makeover Home Edition efforts.

Traci Sooter, Drury Architecture Professor

“I have one student who said she specifically came to Drury because of our involvement with Extreme Makeover Home Edition. So, she was thrilled to find out that she’s actually going to participate in a build.”

The main feature Drury will work on is not a house, but a tribute in the city. Additionally, after the fall break weekend, Drury students will board buses for Joplin to participate in a “smart mob.” A smart mob is similar to a flash mob, but rather than a dance, these students will “do good” in the Joplin community. Dozens of Drury students are expected to converge on Drury’s Joplin project on the afternoon of Monday, Oct. 24. The “smart mob” buses will leave Drury at approximately 12:30 p.m.

“The smart mob is a great opportunity for those students that want to help out Joplin in a compressed time frame,” says Dr. Regina Waters, associate professor of communication who helped organize the smart mob. “We’ll board buses on Monday and, with dozens of hands, work feverishly to help our friends to the west re-build their community. The energy and excitement our students have for this project has been inspiring.”

Extreme Makeover's Ty Pennington videotapes Sooter (in sunglasses) and her students in 2009

In 2005, Sooter and Drury students worked on a bunkhouse at Camp Barnabas in Purdy, Mo. as part of an Extreme Makeover Home Edition build. Drury was invited back in 2007 to work on a home in Murfreesboro, Ark. In 2009, the Drury community worked closer to home in Ash Grove, Mo. as they built, what Sooter called, “a tricked out” chicken coop for the Hampton family.

Media Contact in Joplin for Drury University: Traci Sooter, AIA, Associate Professor of Architecture, Office: (417) 873-7416, Mobile: (417) 234-6405, E-mail: tsooter@drury.edu

Drury Media Contact: Mark Miller, M.A., Associate Director of Marketing and Communications, Mobile: (417) 839-2886, Work: (417) 873-7390, -E-mail: markmiller@drury.edu

###

The Emmy award winning reality program “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition,” now in its 9th season, is produced by Endemol USA, a division of Endemol Holding. It’s executive-produced by Brady Connell and George Verschoor. David Goldberg is Chairman, Endemol North America. Episodes currently air Sunday from 7-8 p.m., CT on ABC. Beginning October 21, 2011, episodes will air Friday nights from 7-8 p.m., CT on ABC.

Drury is an independent University, church related, grounded in the liberal arts tradition and committed to personalized education in a community of scholars who value the arts of teaching and learning. Education at Drury seeks to cultivate spiritual sensibilities and imaginative faculties as well as ethical insight and critical thought; to foster the integration of theoretical and practical knowledge; and to liberate persons to participate responsibly in and contribute to a global community. For more information, visit www.drury.edu/strategicplan.

University Communications staff are available to news media 24 hours a day at (417) 839-2886. Visit the Office of University Communications online at http://news.drury.edu. Resources include a searchable Expert Guide, staff contacts and downloadable print-quality images and logos.

Renowned architect to discuss green building at Drury on Friday, Sept. 16

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Sept. 13, 2011 — Author and architect, John Quale, will discuss the importance of the environment and architecture on Friday, Sept. 16 at 1 p.m. in the Hammons School of Architecture Multi-Purpose Room at Drury University.  This event is free and open to the public.

An associate professor of architecture at the University of Virginia, Quale is credited with starting the ecoMOD project. This interdisciplinary research and design initiative began with the goal of providing affordable housing that is sustainable and composed from prefabricated pieces. Since its creation, the project has built six affordable housing units, renovated three housing units and is currently planning for four new units. EcoMOD has received national recognition, including awards from the US Green Building Council, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA).

John Quale has been a Fulbright Scholar in Japan and has also been the Thomas Jefferson Fellow at Cambridge. He is the author of Trojan Goat: A Self Sufficient House and his latest book, Sustainable, Affordable, Prefab: the ecoMOD Project is set to be published this year.

Media Contact:
Karen Cordes Spence
Assistant Professor of Architecture
Office: (417) 873-7409
E-mail: kspence@drury.edu

###

Drury architecture students help visually impaired children develop their senses

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., June 14, 2011 —Drury architecture students were looking for ways to give back to their community when they began a partnership with the Beisner Vision Rehabilitation Center of the Ozarks (VRCO).  As a result of this partnership, students were able to construct an interactive mural for visually impaired children who visit the center.

The mural operates as a panel system. Each panel has a different set of interactive activities so that children can further develop their senses despite their vision loss. When the four panels are put together the system acts as a mural that can also be converted into a magnetic chalkboard, which will allow instructors to further assist patients.

Vision Center Mural

The twelve students engaged in the project began work with VRCO as part of their involvement with Freedom by Design, a national organization that focuses on the service element of the American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS). This organization aims to teach college students how to resolve accessibility issues while simultaneously providing them with real world experience.

Last year, this same group of students constructed a handicap ramp for a woman living on her own within the community. This ramp allowed her to enter and exit her home more easily. “Our hope is that we will be able to continue these projects for many years to come,” said Patrick Butler, a recent Drury graduate and former president of Freedom by Design.

Located in the center of Springfield, Mo., the Beisner Vision Rehabilitation Center of the Ozarks strives to provide people with vision loss the opportunity to live to their potential and have a more independent quality of life.  To learn more about this organization visit its website at: http://www.beisnervisionrehab.org/

Media Contact: Patrick Butler, Former President, Drury Freedom by Design, Mobile: (417) 631-8947, E-mail: pbutler85@gmail.com

###

Commercial Club Dedicates C-Street Co-Op booth built by Drury architecture students

Springfield, MO., June 7, 2011 — This Saturday, June 11, at noon, Commercial Club of Springfield will dedicate its new C-Street Market Co-Op booth.  Built by Traci Sooter’s Design-Build Class it will stand next to the C-Street Market Pavilion, designed and built by Ms. Sooter’s students six years ago.  Based on input from Commercial Club, the booth is moveable, contains storage and will function as a co-op produce stand, an office and a ticket booth for concerts and events. The C-Street Market is on Commercial at Jefferson Avenue.

Drury students started working on the booth on May 16, and will continue to work in “Extreme Makeover” fashion, Monday through Friday.  A dedication celebration during Market Day and featuring live music is scheduled for Saturday, June 11 at noon.

“These students are extremely talented and community minded; their goal was to build a very flexible and environmentally friendly structure for the community with 97 percent of materials coming from within a 1-mile radius ,” said Paul Parker, President, Commercial Club.  “This booth will add to our offerings here at the market by encouraging neighborhood gardeners and community gardens to vend their produce through us for a small fee here at our Co-Op Booth.”

The Club will keep a 25 percent commission on sales with all proceeds used to promote the C-Street Market.  Vendors who choose to trade out time may work for 2 hours at the booth in order to keep 100 percent of their proceeds.

Councilman Nick Ibarra is supportive of the C-Street Co-Op as a community resource in Zone 1.  He is processing a request to use a small portion of his Zone 1 Pothole Fund to cover the cost of construction materials.  He plans to attend the dedication as well.

Commercial Club of Springfield has a long history of partnering with multiple groups to support and promote the revitalization of Commercial Street.  Drury’s current involvement is the latest of a number of projects used to move the district forward over the past 15 plus years.  For this project, the Club has also partnered with The Kitchen Inc. and will receive a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) on July 1. The CDBG grant will fund a Market Master position, held by Aubree Taylor who will also manage the Co-Op Booth.

The grant will also provide some marketing and promotional materials for the new Co-Op.

Commercial Club of Springfield is one of Springfield’s oldest civic organizations with a goal to preserve, protect and promote the Commercial Street Historic District.  Its current focus is projects that strengthen the commercial and residential district’s social, cultural and historic activities.

Photo attached by Collette Studios

Clockwise from upper left: Jacob Cordonnier, “Echo” Ying Xiang, Kirsten Sharp, Cody Hearne, Kirsten Whitehead, Mary Collette, Professor Traci Sooter

Media contacts:
Paul Parker, President of Commercial Club, 417-987-6749.
Traci Sooter, Drury University, Community Design/Build Professor, 417-234-6405.
Aubree Taylor, C-Street Market Manager, 417-496-1968.
Donnie Rodgers, Community Development Coordinator with the Urban Districts Alliance, 417-831-6200.

Commercial Club of Springfield
299 East Commercial
Springfield, Missouri 65803

Drury architecture students develop a co-op booth on C-Street

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 31, 2011 — Six years ago, Drury architecture students designed and built the pavilion that shelters the C-Street Market on Commercial Street. This summer, a new crop of Drury students will design and construct a co-op booth adjacent to the C-Street Market Pavilion at the intersection of Jefferson and Commercial Street.

The booth the students construct must be moveable, contain storage and function as both a produce stand and a ticket booth for concerts and events. The students are striving to create a C-Street Market Co-op Booth that is both of and for the community.

“We are honored to be invited back to C-Street for another Design/Build project. Opportunities for students to put their design skills to the test and build full-scale projects for charities or communities in need are priceless educational experiences,” said Traci Sooter, Drury associate professor of architecture.

Drury has a long history of supporting and promoting the revitalization of Commercial Street. The C-Street Market is a committee of Commercial Club of Springfield. The club partnered with The Kitchen Inc. and has been approved for a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) to fund a Market Master position to manage the C-Street market, as well as some marketing and promotional materials, which will include signage for the new co-op booth.

Drury students started working on the booth on May 16, and will continue to work Monday through Friday with plans to install the booth at the C-Street Market on June 3. A dedication celebration is scheduled for Saturday, June 11 at noon.

Media Contact:
Traci Sooter, AIA
Associate Professor of Architecture
Office: (417) 873-7416
E-mail: tsooter@drury.edu

###

Drury Architecture students help to revitalize Missouri cities

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., April 27, 2011 — Drury University architecture students are continuing their work to improve urban and rural development throughout Missouri as a part of Drury University’s Center for Community Studies (CCS). Students meet with their communities several times during the semester and collaborate with the citizens to envision a future, which the students present in a book, they call the “visioning toolkit.”

Rich Hill, Mo. is located 20 miles north of Nevada, Mo. along Highway 71. Rich Hill, which began with a booming mining industry, is now faced with a dwindling population and little economic activity. Among the projects Drury students will propose are plans to address rising energy costs and new activities to attract youth and create career opportunities.

Students will also address concerns in Stockton, Mo., which is located approximately 60 miles north of Springfield, Mo. Among some of the student proposals for thetown are plans to continue stabilizing the community after severe tornado damage in 2003, reconnect the town’s cultural history and heritage to the local waterways, and develop a stronger retirement community.

Carthage, Mo., located 60 miles west of Springfield, Mo., is also working with the CCS.  The students working with Carthage are proposing projects that will celebrate the community’s rich history while also celebrating the rapidly increasing diversity within the area.

Though proposing different projects for all three towns, students working within Crane, Galena, and Reeds Spring will tackle very similar objectives. Located less than 40 miles south of Springfield, Mo., these communities are closelylinked both by mileage and by needs. Drury students will present ideas thatwill address ways to attract new jobs and cultural activities, emphasize the historic elements of each town, and increase opportunities for new business endeavors.

Central High School, located across the street from Drury, is also receiving suggestions from the CCS.  Facing increasing enrollment, the high school is beginning to outgrow its building and is looking for ways to better address the needs of its community. Students at Drury have been focusing on highlighting fine arts and technical arts, while also incorporating the urban community within their proposals.

Students will present their final proposals on the following dates:

  • Galena—Monday, May 9, at 7 p.m., at the Galena Public Library.
  • Stockton—Monday, May 2, at 7 p.m., at the Stockton Community Center.
  • Reeds Spring—Tuesday, May 10, at 6:30 p.m., at the Reeds Spring High School in the library.
  • Rich Hill—Tuesday, May 10, at 7 p.m., at Rich Hill High School.
  • Central High School—Wednesday, May 11, at 3 p.m., in the choral room.
  • Carthage—Monday, May 9, at 7 p.m. at the Memorial Hall.
  • Crane—Thursday, May 12, at 7 p.m. at Crane High School

The students will rehearse their presentations for the architecture faculty on Monday, May 2, 2011 and Wednesday May 4, 2011 from 1-5 p.m. in the Hammons School of Architecture.

Even more than downtown revitalization and beautification, CCS projects could help save lives. In the spring of 2009, Drury students worked in Monett, Mo. to organize and develop a plan to alleviate downtown flooding. In the past, Monett’s flooding has caused severe property damage and at least one fatality. This fall, Monett was one of five cities to receive a grant from the Downtown Revitalization and Economic Assistance for Missouri (DREAM) Initiative.

According to the Monett Times, “Monett’s application for the fifth round of DREAM combined the Vision 2030 report prepared by the Drury University architecture students with the cooperative venture between the city, the Monett Chamber of Commerce and the downtown merchants in establishing the new position of downtown coordinator, which is now held by DJ Miller.”

Another former Center for Community Studies client, Ozark, also received a DREAM grant in the fall of 2010. That makes five former CCS communities that have directlybenefited from the Drury students’ work.

Drury’s CCS works with the Missouri Extension Office to prepare communities before Drury students begin working with communities. After students have completed their projects, MU Extension continues to work with communities in carrying out an action plan. The students’ work is a valuable tool for Missouri cities. CCS only charges around $6,000 for their services, a small fee considering the 2,700 in-kind hours donated by architecture students throughout the semester.

Contact:
Jay Garrott, AIA
Director & Professor, Drury Center for Community Studies
Office: (417) 873-7371
E-mail
: jgarrott@drury.edu
Or
Jeff Barber
University of Missouri Extension
Mobile: (417) 343-5682
E-mail:
barberj@missouri.edu

###