architecture

Drury Architecture professor to speak at Crystal Bridges Museum of Art

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Nov. 2, 2015 — A Drury University professor will give a lecture that draws on both personal and professional experiences at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, this week.

Hammons School of Architecture professor Nancy Chikaraishi’s lecture will look at the process and shared boundaries of creating space in art and architecture. It will include work from her previously released exhibit “Life Interrupted,” a collection of drawings and paintings portraying her parents’ stories from their time in a Japanese Internment camp in Rohwer, Arkansas, during World War II. The presentation is at 7 p.m. on Nov. 4 and will include several new pieces created by Chikaraishi that were inspired by the CORE Performance Company.

Nancy Chikaraishi

Nancy Chikaraishi

Chikaraishi worked as a visual artist with CORE Performance Company on “Gaman,” a dance/theatrical performance that explores how challenges can be overcome by courage; and expresses the conflicting emotions of sorrow and joy, confinement and liberation experienced by the interned Japanese-American citizens. A public performance of “Gaman” will be held at the University of Central Arkansas on Nov. 9 and at Crystal Bridges on Nov. 11.

“Hopefully, we can shed light on these kinds of events and prevent them from happening again,” Chikaraishi said. “A lot of people still don’t know that there were camps in Arkansas. I think it’s very important that we understand our history when it comes to issues of race and discrimination.”

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Crowder-Drury team finishes 8th overall in Solar Decathlon competition

The Crowder-Drury team finished in 8th place overall in the 2015 Solar Decathlon, the U.S. Department of Energy announced today in Irvine, California. The team’s ShelteR3 (pronounced “Shelter Cubed”) home was more than 18 months in the making. The highly interdisciplinary project brought Crowder and Drury students to the national stage to showcase their expertise in architecture, engineering, marketing, communication and design. About 140 teams applied for entry into the competition – 20 were accepted and 14 actually made it to the competition itself.

“We are extremely proud of what this team has accomplished here over the last year and a half,” said Dr. Robert Weddle, dean of the Hammons School of Architecture at Drury. “The atmosphere surrounding this competition here in Irvine has been a once-in-a-lifetime experience for our students. The opportunity to design and build this home from concept to competition has been an invaluable learning process for each of them.”

Drury student Michaela Cantrell plugs in a Nissan Leaf after the electric car was driven 25 miles for a competition during the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon in Irvine, California on Friday, Oct. 9. (Credit: Thomas Kelsey/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)

Drury student Michaela Cantrell plugs in a Nissan Leaf after the electric car was driven 25 miles for a competition during the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon in Irvine, California on Friday, Oct. 9. (Credit: Thomas Kelsey/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)

The team will disassemble the house in the coming days. Following transport back to the Ozarks, the house will find a permanent place in Joplin, the community that inspired its unique design.

Follow, connect with and congratulate the team:

Visitors line up to tour the Crowder College and Drury University house during the  Decathlon. (Credit: Thomas Kelsey/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)

Visitors line up to tour the Crowder College and Drury University house during the Decathlon. (Credit: Thomas Kelsey/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)

About the Solar Decathlon

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Decathlon pits future architects, engineers, marketers and business people from the nation’s top colleges against one another, challenging them to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient and attractive. The winner of the competition will be the team that best blends affordability, consumer appeal, and design excellence with optimal energy production and maximum efficiency.

The Crowder-Drury entry accomplishes all this – and more. The ShelteR3 house has a three-prong design philosophy of Respond, Recover and Resist. Inspired by the devastating and deadly 2011 Joplin tornado, the house is transportable so that it can be trucked to disaster areas during emergency response and recovery efforts. It can then be converted in a permanent and stylish living structure that is designed to resist the extreme winds and debris clouds of potential tornadoes. For more on the house, check out this overview video.

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Drury team awarded 3rd place in 2015 ACSA Design Competition

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., September 22, 2015 — A team comprised of two Drury students, an alumnus and a professor earned 3rd place out of more than 500 entries in an international design contest sponsored by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA).

The 2014-2015 Steel Design Student Competition challenged architecture students to design a library guided by the principles of innovation, creativity, identity, sustainability and functionality. Additionally, design proposals were to take a strong conceptual position about the changing nature of the library as a building type and as a mirror of contemporary culture.

Library exterior view

Library exterior view

Current 5th-year students Junye Zhou and Tony Tai-An Yue and 2014 Drury graduate Nicholas Fish, worked with Visiting Assistant Professor Yong Huang on their library design as an extra-curricular project in addition to their academic and professional obligations. The work, titled “Beacon – Heterotopia of Lagos’ Public Space,” is posted on the ACSA website and will be published in an upcoming book. It will also be exhibited at the ACSA National Convention in Seattle in March and at the American Institute of Architects Annual Convention in Philadelphia in May.

This is the first time Drury has placed in this national contest juried by well-known and award-winning practitioners and educators.

A reading room within the library.

A reading room within the library.

“This is a fantastic accomplishment for this talented team and the committed professor who worked closely with them in a less formal setting than the typical studio or classroom setting,” said Dr. Robert Weddle, dean of the Hammons School of Architecture. “This is the kind of experience fostered by the unique environment of Drury and the HSA where students and faculty know each other well and collaborate on projects they’re passionate about.”

All accredited architecture programs in the United States and Canada are ACSA members, and other affiliated programs bring the number of member schools to more than 250. The ACSA’s student competitions are the largest and most important annual competitions for architecture students.

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Solar Decathlon house nears completion; open house Sept. 22

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Sept. 17, 2015 — A diverse team of students from Drury University and Crowder College is entering the final stretch of an 18-month-long effort to design, build and operate a cutting-edge home for the national Solar Decathlon competition.

The media and public are invited to the Crowder College campus to tour the house and help send off the team from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 22. Student team members, faculty advisors and representatives from some of the project’s many sponsors will be present and available for interviews. Team members are also available in the days before and after the open house, both in Springfield and Neosho.

Outside rendering

The house will be disassembled and loaded onto trucks on Sept. 23 for the trip to the Decathlon, which takes place during the month of October in the desert outside Irvine, California.

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, this international contest pits future architects, engineers, marketers and business people from the nation’s top colleges against one another, challenging them to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient and attractive. The winner of the competition will be the team that best blends affordability, consumer appeal, and design excellence with optimal energy production and maximum efficiency.

The Crowder-Drury entry accomplishes all this – and more. Dubbed ShelteR3, or “Shelter Cubed,” the house has a three-prong design philosophy of Respond, Recover and Resist. Inspired by the devastating and deadly 2011 Joplin tornado, the house is transportable so that it can be trucked to disaster areas during emergency response and recovery efforts. It can then be converted in a permanent and stylish living structure that is designed to resist the extreme winds and debris clouds of potential tornadoes.

“Students from 22 different majors here at Drury and from Crowder have poured countless hours of time and talent into this project over the last year and a half,” said Traci Sooter, project manager and a faculty advisor to the team. “It’s incredibly exciting to see the ShelteR3 house become a reality, and we cannot wait to finally stack our ideas up against the other teams.”

For much more information, including renderings, videos and more about the team’s inspiration, visit http://shelter.drury.edu. For more information about the Decathlon, including a list of other schools in the competition, visit www.solardecathlon.gov.

Media Contacts:

  • Traci Sooter, Professor of Architecture, (417) 234-6405
  • Evan Melgren, Student Communication Chair, (417) 827-1793
  • Cindy Brown, Director of Public Information, Crowder College, (417) 455-5540

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Architecture students to demonstrate VR, 3D printing at Ozarks Maker Faire

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Aug. 28, 2015 — Drury University students from the Hammons School of Architecture will provide interactive demonstrations on 3D computer modeling, 3D printing and virtual reality at the inaugural Ozarks Mini Maker Faire on Saturday.

The field of architecture is rapidly changing with the evolution and application of advanced technology that is enhancing the way professionals design and build spaces and objects. Students and faculty from the school of architecture will provide a chance to see how 3D computer models can be quickly fabricated into real objects with 3D printing, and how people can be deeply immersed in 3D spaces before they are built using virtual reality technology.

VIDEO: Using Oculus Rift to View Architectural Designs

The Ozarks Mini Maker Faire is a gathering of “makers” who are tech enthusiasts, crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, artists, students and commercial exhibitors. The Faire takes place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday at the Springfield Expo Center, 635 St. Louis Street, and at the Discovery Center, 438 E. St. Louis Street.

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Students help shape vision for Riverbluff Cave museum

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 12, 2015 — A group of Drury University architecture students is helping bring dinosaurs to life for the public through the design of exhibit space, and will showcase their work on Wednesday afternoon.

Students from David Beach’s Introduction to Computers in Architecture class will present the exercises they have done in partnership with the Missouri Institute of Natural Science (MINS) from 3 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, May 13, at the Hammons School of Architecture.

The students have spent the spring semester developing building concepts for MINS, a nonprofit museum that supports and maintains Riverbluff Cave. The cave was discovered in 2001 in Green County and contains formations, fossils, claw marks and tracks left behind by animals that lived during the Ice Age. Dating techniques have shown it to be the oldest known Ice Age fossil cave in North America. The concepts are just that, and do not reflect actual design work to be used by the museum.

Inspired by the new exhibit under construction at MINS – the largest Triceratops skeleton yet discovered – the students developed new designs for future dinosaur exhibits. Each student developed an understanding of the site and basic building form through environmental simulation, studies of their dinosaur’s form, physical modeling of their virtual prototypes, and the development of a building information model. The final review on Wednesday will include poster presentations of the building designs, final prototyped models (of both buildings and dinosaurs), and real-time animated walk-throughs of the design using virtual reality.

Beach, who is also a member of the MINS Board of Trustees, said the student projects help provide an understanding for the future development of the Riverbluff site as it continues to become a premiere museum and research institute for natural history.

The mission of the Missouri Institute of Natural Science is to interpret Missouri’s natural history within a regional and global context in a manner that is relevant, useful, educational and entertaining to all patrons. For more information, go to www.monatsci.org.

Lectures, juried prize cap academic year at Hammons School of Architecture

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 5, 2015 — This week the faculty and students of the Hammons School of Architecture mark the end of another outstanding academic year with special lectures and juries associated with the Librarium Prize. Now in its 15th year, the annual Librarium exhibition and competition recognizes exemplary design work by third-, fourth-, and fifth-year students at HSA.

The slate kicks off at 2:45 p.m. on Thursday with a lecture by HSA alumnus Marcus Farr ’99. Farr is the Director of Farr Projects, based in Boulder, Colorado – a progressive, entrepreneurial research and design studio that operates in the areas of ‪architecture, interior environments, digital fabrications and ‪material research.

At 4 p.m., a public jury will judge the thesis work of six 5th-year architecture students nominated for the Librarium Prize. In addition to Farr, jurors will include Librarium speaker Vincent James of Minneapolis and HSA alumnus Andrew Wells ’91, co-founder of Dake Wells Architecture in Springfield. The thesis project is the product of a year-long investigation of a topic selected by the student, informed by in-depth research in the fall semester, followed by design investigation, development and resolution in the spring.

The students whose work was nominated are Pema Wangzome, Alaa AlRadwan, Mikhail Digman, Juan Zorrilla, Eric Baldwin and Juan Trejo.

James will present a lecture at 1 p.m. on Friday, followed by the announcement of the Librarium Prize winners. James is the Principal of VJAA, a comprehensive studio that encompasses architectural design, environmentally sustainable design, adaptive reuse, historic renovation and preservation, and master planning. VJAA is the recipient of the 2012 American Institute of Architects Firm Award. He is currently Cass Gilbert Professor in Practice at the University of Minnesota School of Architecture.

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Media Contact: Saundra Weddle, Professor of Architecture – (417) 873-7437 or sweddle@drury.edu.

Solar-powered home for competition takes shape with “build day”

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., April 9, 2015 — The Crowder-Drury Solar Decathlon Team will hold a “build day” for the ShelteR³ disaster resilient house from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. this Saturday on the Crowder College campus in Neosho.

Students from Crowder College and Drury University have partnered to design, engineer, market, and construct a solar powered and storm resistant home for the Solar Decathlon 2015, a national event hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Students from both schools will be on hand to continue building the house on site, as required by the competition. This fall the team will deconstruct, transport and rebuild the home at the competition site in Irvine, California. That’s where the team will compete against more than a dozen other respected schools such as Yale, Clemson, Missouri S&T and California Polytechnic State University in October.

Bird's eye view of the Shelter3 house.

Bird’s eye view of the Shelter3 house.

While all teams will be building an environmentally conscious solar powered home, the Crowder-Drury team has self-imposed the additional challenge of making its home disaster resilient. The idea for ShelteR³ is based on three Rs: respond, recover, and resist. The motivation began to develop after the immediate and long-term effects of the EF-5 tornado that hit Joplin in 2011 directly impacted students from both Drury and Crowder.

You can learn more at shelter.drury.edu or by following @CrowderDrurySol on Twitter.

For more information about the Crowder-Drury Solar Decathlon and to learn about sponsorship opportunities, visit: shelter.drury.edu, send an email to tsooter@drury.edu, or call (417) 234-6405.

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Media Contact: Traci Sooter, project manager, Crowder-Drury Solar Decathlon, Hammons School of Architecture Faculty. Cell: (417) 234-6405 or email: tsooter@drury.edu.

Architecture symposium highlights the role of design in small towns

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., April 6, 2015 — The Hammons School of Architecture will host a symposium titled “Design in the Middle: Making Place in the American Small Town” from 1 to 5 p.m. Friday, April 10 in the HSA Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public.

The symposium will investigate the role of design in shaping public life and giving identity to smaller towns in the American landscape. In such locations, creative and critical architecture challenges the widely held view that design serves merely as aesthetic gloss or a budgetary luxury. Award-winning architects from around the region will present significant projects executed by their firms, which will serve as a starting point for a roundtable discussion.

The speakers include Marlon Blackwell of Marlon Blackwell Architects in Fayetteville, Ark.; Jeffery Day of Min Day in Omaha, Neb., and San Francisco; David Dowell of el dorado in Kansas City; Steve McDowell of BNIM in Kansas City and Drury alumnus Andrew Wells of Dake Wells Architecture in Springfield.

The symposium is part of the HSA 2014-2015 Lecture Series “Locating Design,” which explores the practice of critically engaging physical sites through the act of design.

For more information about the Hammons School of Architecture, visit drury.edu/architecture.

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Media Contact: Dr. Saundra Weddle, Professor of Architecture, “Locating Design” lecture series chair; Office: (417) 873-7437 or email: sweddle@drury.edu.

Groundbreaking for Solar Decathlon house will be held Tuesday, March 10

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., March 5, 2015 — Students from more than a dozen majors will come together this week to officially mark the beginning of the construction phase of the ShelterR3 home on Tuesday, March 10, at Drury University. The energy-neutral home is being constructed for competition in the Solar Decathlon 2015, a national event hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy.

The ceremony will take place in the Trustee Science Center on the university campus, from 2:30 to 4 p.m.

The house will be constructed on the campus of Crowder College in Neosho, Mo., Drury’s partner school in the Solar Decathlon 2015 competition. Crowder will hold a joint ceremony at the same time on its campus, and the two events will be linked by teleconference. During the Drury event, student leaders will share their inspiration for the project and offer an exclusive look at the some of the key aspects of the designs.

Students from Crowder College and Drury University have partnered to design, engineer, market, and construct a solar powered and storm resistant home for the 2015 Solar Decathlon competition. While all teams will be building an environmentally conservative solar powered home, the Crowder-Drury team has self-imposed the additional challenge of making its home disaster resilient.

Artist rendering of the Shelter3 house.

Artist rendering of the Shelter3 house.

The idea for ShelteR3 is based on three Rs: respond, recover, and resist. It’s the guiding philosophy for the project, and it’s what will make this home unique and effective. The motivation began to develop after the immediate and long-term effects of the EF-5 tornado that hit Joplin in 2011 directly impacted students from both Drury and Crowder.

The team will transport the home after it is built to the competition site in Irvine, California. That’s where the team will compete against more than a dozen other respected schools such as Yale, Clemson, Missouri S&T and California Polytechnic State University in October. More than a quarter million people are expected to tour the home at the competition site.

You can follow the event live online at shelter.drury.edu or on Twitter by following @CrowderDrurySol.

For more information about the Crowder-Drury Solar Decathlon and to learn about sponsorship opportunities, visit: shelter.drury.edu, send an email to tsooter@drury.edu, or call (417) 234-6405.

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Media Contacts: Chase Snider, Communications Team Leader; cell: (417) 631-9780, email: csnider@drury.edu.  Traci Sooter, Project Manager, Hammons School of Architecture Faculty, cell: (417) 234-6405, email: tsooter@drury.edu.