architecture

Architecture trip offers glimpse of the past, window to the future

Touring the streets of an unfamiliar metropolitan city is not everyday coursework for most students. But it was the experience for a group of Drury architecture students who recently returned from a four-day trip to Chicago this fall.

Bruce Moore is a professor at Drury’s Hammons School of Architecture and one of the instructors for ARCH 315, a design studio class for third-year architecture students. The class takes a field trip like this once every year, an experience Moore believes is essential to students’ education.

“Imagery is valuable,” he says, “but actually going into the buildings, touching the buildings, experiencing them as they feel, is just not the same as looking at pictures. You can describe it all you want to but going is something else.”

The class took the opportunity to tour many of Chicago’s well-known buildings and urban areas, including a walking tour downtown.

“Chicago is like a museum of architecture,” Moore says. “In one morning we were able to walk the history of architecture.”

Students will take the knowledge they gained and apply it to projects that they are working on in class. But the trip was about more than just witnessing examples of good architecture; it also provided students with a valuable peek into the lives of contemporary architects. The class paid visits to two different Chicago architecture firms, including an office tour at Perkins + Will, one of the top-ranking firms in the world.

“The visits gave me some new perspectives on things I haven’t thought about before,” says Drury architecture student Connor Stokes. “It’s much more of a team environment rather than just individual projects.”

At the second firm, Tilton, Kelly + Bell, students were even able to meet with an alum of the Hammons School of Architecture, Tiara Hughes.

“These days just about everywhere we go there are alumni in the area,” Moore says. He finds alumni are always more than happy to share their experience with current students, and Hughes was no exception.

“Tiara talked about the firm and spent a long time interacting with students about what it’s like to get out of school and get started working,” Moore says.

Students left the visits with valuable networking connections they can carry with them into the future.

“It’s definitely a good relationship builder,” says Stokes. “I know a few of our students from our third-year class are thinking about interning at a couple of the firms we visited.”

Moore believes that few other cities could allow for this kind of learning experience.

“To see all that work that is theoretical and academic work done by professionals who are exploring the fringes of architecture, pushing architecture into new areas – you can’t see that just anywhere.”

Story by Bryan Haynes, Office of Marketing & Communications graduate assistant

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Film shows impact of Joplin tornado healing garden created by DU students

Media Contact: Traci Sooter – Professor of Architecture; Director of Design-Build Programs: (417) 234-6405

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 22, 2017 — Since opening three years ago, the Landscapes of Resilience Butterfly Garden & Overlook in Joplin has helped the residents of a tornado-ravaged community experience healing and recovery through nature and thoughtful design.

Today, on the sixth anniversary of the Joplin tornado, a short documentary film telling the story of this project – designed by the Drury University Hammons School of Architecture’s Design-Build Program – is being released.

The seven-minute film, titled “Butterfly Angels,” shines a light on an effort that drew together an eclectic and passionate team of people, many from Joplin and the surrounding area; others from a thousand miles away. Together, they focused on conceptualizing and creating a green space, a healing garden, for the purpose of helping the people of Joplin deal with the enormous trauma inflicted by the tornado.

The film will be available for viewing starting Monday at: http://www.natureeffect.org/Joplin. It will also be featured by AccuWeather on television and online.

3-butterfly-garden-overlook-3

“The devastation that Joplin experienced was beyond what most of us can fully imagine,” said Alden Stoner, the producer and co-director behind “Butterfly Angels.” “When we think of disaster recovery, most of us envision the rebuilding process — the reconstruction of homes, businesses — but in truth, it’s about something much deeper.”

Among the voices heard in the film are those of Drury architecture professors and co-lead project designers Traci Sooter and Nancy Chikaraishi; and Chris Cotten, head of Joplin’s Parks and Recreation Department and a Drury alumnus. Others include former mayor Melodee Colbert-Kean and Cornell University’s Keith Tidball, who has long studied how nature can be a source of resilience for communities.

The Garden & Overlook project showcases a unique aspect of the Hammons School’s Design-Build Program: a “whole school” approach that pulls in students and faculty members from across Drury’s liberal arts spectrum. English students collected and transcribed survivor stories, which inspired design students prior to the build, and were eventually quoted on the storyboards in the garden. Psychology faculty has studied the healing aspects of the garden for Joplin residents. More than 60 students, staff and faculty converged on the site to install some features. Music Therapy students played music to motivate, uplift, and rejuvenate volunteers.

“Butterfly Angels” was produced by Stoneworth Studios, in partnership with the TKF Foundation, a nonprofit devoted to enabling more opportunities for people to experience the healing and restorative benefits of nature. The Foundation, through its Nature Sacred Award program, was a major funder of the Garden, which is also serving as a research site for Tidball and a team of fellow researchers from Drury University and the USDA National Forest Service. The team is seeking to learn more about the benefits of specific aspects of these types of green spaces.

Learn more about the Butterfly Garden & Overlook at: http://www.drury.edu/butterfly-garden.

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Students present vision for Hazelwood Cemetery ahead of 150th anniversary

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 5, 2017 — A team of Drury architecture students is helping the City of Springfield envision the future of the largest municipally owned cemetery in the state of Missouri.

Hazelwood Cemetery will celebrate its 150th anniversary in October. As part of the city’s celebration of this event, the Springfield Public Works Department asked the Center for Community Studies at Drury’s Hammons School of Architecture to assist in a community-based visioning process to identify a long-term master plan for the cemetery.

The public is invited to a meeting at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 9, at the Schweitzer Brentwood Branch Library to hear recommendations that have resulted from a community input process.

A group of eight third-year architecture students have spent the past several months working closely with city staff and a citizen advisory committee to assess current conditions and challenges, research cultural practices and trends in the funeral industry, and identify the community’s wants and needs. A few of the recommendations that will be discussed are: consideration of a new main entry off Sunset Street, a new cemetery office/maintenance complex, a “Celebration of Life Center,” development of columbarium and sprinkle-gardens, and establishment of a commemorative monument for the cemetery’s 150th anniversary.

The Drury team will use presentation boards, videos, and models to help illustrate these recommendations. The architecture students were supervised by Professor Jay Garrott, director of the Center for Community Studies, with the assistance of Jeff Barber, environmental design state specialist with the University of Missouri-Extension.

The citizen advisory committee and city staff will continue to oversee development of the plan for throughout the summer with the intent of presenting the final vision at the October celebration of the cemetery’s 150th anniversary.

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Media Contact: Jay Garrott, Professor of Architecture & Director of the Center for Community Studies: (417) 873-7371 or jgarrott@drury.edu.

Events explore lessons from WWII-era Japanese-American internment camps

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., January 31, 2017 — A multi-disciplinary series of events and performances at Drury University will tell the story of the internment camps set up by the U.S. government to hold Japanese-Americans during World War II. The camps were result of President Franklin Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066 signed in the weeks after the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.

Chikaraishi

Chikaraishi

“Life Interrupted: Art for Social Change” is a project that brings together the arts, humanities, history and political science departments at Drury, along with the greater Springfield community and the CORE Performance Company, to hear about the camps and ask what we can learn from the experience.

How have these same issues of civil rights violations, racial profiling, discrimination, immigration and xenophobia shifted, changed, or stayed the same? How do we ensure the safety of our country without discriminating against ethnic and religious minorities?

“It’s 75 years past and we’re still grappling with the same issues – fear of people we don’t know, fear of people who look different from us,” says Nancy Chikaraishi, a Drury architecture professor whose parents and grandparents were forced into the camps, and who is the lead organizer for the series of “Life Interrupted” events at Drury.

MORE: Read an interview with Chikaraishi about her personal connection to the internment camps and how she became involved in the “Life Interrupted” project.

The events begin on Thursday with a roundtable discussion with community leaders, followed by a dance workshop and art installation on Friday and a performance on Saturday of “Life Interrupted” by CORE, which is based in Atlanta and Houston. A final panel discussion on the nature of architecture and power will be held next week.

Full list of events:

Thursday, Feb. 2, 6 p.m. – Roundtable discussion with local community leaders led by Drury political science professors Dr. Daniel Ponder and Dr. Jeff Vandenberg, with representatives from the Islamic Society of Joplin, NAACP, Temple Israel, and PROMO. Location: Reed Auditorium, Trustee Science Center on the Drury campus.

Friday Feb. 3, 3-4:30 p.m. – Dance workshop and story circle with the CORE Performance Company. Participants will be guided through the story circle process, sharing personal stories related to the themes investigated in “Life Interrupted.” No previous dance experience is required. Participants are encouraged to wear clothing that will not inhibit moving freely. Location: Drury on C-Street Gallery, 233 E. Commercial Street.

Friday, Feb. 3, 5-8 p.m. – Interactive art installation & exhibition opening led by Nancy Chikaraishi and Drury students (following the dance workshop and story circle). Location: Drury on C-Street Gallery, 233 E. Commercial Street.

Saturday, Feb. 4, 7:30 p.m. – “Life Interrupted” dance theatrical performance by the CORE Performance Company. Reserve tickets for free online. Location: Wilhoit Theater, Breech School of Business, corner of Central Street and Drury Lane.

Tuesday, Feb. 7, 6-7:30 p.m. – Panel Discussion on Architecture & Power, led by Drury architecture professors Dr. Robert Weddle, Dr. Panos Leventis and Nancy Chikaraishi. Location: Drury on C-Street Gallery, 233 E. Commercial Street.

This project is supported in part by awards from the Mid-America Arts Alliance, National Endowment for the Arts, Missouri Arts Council, and foundations, corporations and individuals throughout Arkansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Texas, Springfield Regional Arts Council and Community Foundation of the Ozarks, DoubleTree by Hilton, Nelson and Kelley Still Nichols, Colorgraphic Printing, Drury University, Drury University’s Hammons School of Architecture and the L.E. Meador Center for Politics and Citizenship.

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Media Contact: Nancy Chikaraishi, Professor of Architecture: (417) 873-7459 or nchikaraishi@drury.edu.

Drury grad turns passion for design, business and travel into career

By Jessie Roller

A master’s degree in business, another master’s degree in architecture, plus a passion for travel led 2013 Drury graduate Danny Collins to become a successful entrepreneur, launching his new company, Project Latitude, at age 28.

While at Drury, the Springfield native earned his undergraduate degree and both master’s degrees all in six years – no easy task given the rigorous nature of the programs. He recently returned to Drury to speak to business and architecture students about his ever-changing career path.

After graduation, Collins landed a job at an architecture firm in New York City. After working there three years, he realized the corporate world of architecture just wasn’t for him and he began forming the idea of combining the two passions in his life, architecture and travel, into what became Project Latitude.

Collins in Guatemala with the Waxpi duffle bag.

Collins in Guatemala with the Waxpi duffle bag.

“I’ve always been a person that desired to be a larger part of something small rather than a small part of something large,” Collins says. “I am a firm believer in passion in the workplace and the concept of living to work not simply working to live.”

Collins founded Project Latitude with his partner and friend, Javier Roig. Its products fund needed improvements in small towns and communities within Latin America, and potentially around the world. Each unique product is solely created in these communities, with earnings going back into the communities funding needs such as infrastructure improvements. Volunteers who travel to the community do much of the physical work.

Project Latitude has seen initial success with its first project and product: the Chaski backpack made in Ecuador. It began as a crowd-funded project on Kickstarter. A second product, the Waxpi duffle bag, is also made in Ecuador.

Collins describes the brand identity as “the urban adventurer.”

Danny Collins

“These will be items for the person who has an office job from 9-to-5, but also likes to get out and do some exploring,” he says. The products will continue to be made and produce revenue for its community even after the Project Latitude team of volunteers complete their improvements.

Collins attributes much of his success to Drury. “The liberal arts program was very fitting for someone like me,” he says, “where I could learn what it was that I wanted to do, but I didn’t have to go straight in having no other choices than the degree I had chosen.”

In addition to tackling two master’s degrees while in school, Collins was also a member of the men’s soccer team and was involved in the vibrant everyday life Drury offers. He says that intense blend of opportunities led to his desire to combine many different concepts into one career — which was really the underlying idea of the company.

During his recent talk with Drury students, Collins encouraged them not to settle for just any job, but instead to go out and find what they truly love and then make it into a career.

He also advocated for all students, and people, to study business in some way.

“The world is a business and everything we do is a business, in some fashion or another,” he says.

The Chaski backpack

The Chaski backpack

Collins says his MBA has helped him immensely with his business, and in his personal life. His business knowledge has been helpful to him with issues such as mortgage agreements, for example, which is why he believes business education can benefit everyone, no matter their career.

Collins and Roig have big dreams for their company. They hope to one day have their own Project Latitude storefront, but for now they are working on placing products into existing retail stores, such as 5 Pound Apparel in Springfield (a boutique business started by another Drury graduate, Bryan Simpson). The goal is to sell about 50 percent of their products at retail and the other 50 percent on their own online platform.

But the true endgame is about more than sales.

“The goal for Project Latitude would never be to just sell products,” Collins says. “We want it to be a lifestyle brand and a lifestyle in a community of people who just want to do cool things and do some good while they’re doing it.”

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Professor Emeritus Michael Buono elected to AIA College of Fellows

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., May 24, 2016 — Drury University professor emeritus Michael Buono has been selected by the American Institute of Architects to its prestigious College of Fellows. Buono, who retired in 2015, was formally inducted last week during the AIA national meeting in Philadelphia.

The College of Fellows, founded in 1952, is composed of members of the Institute who are elected to Fellowship by a jury of their peers. Fellowship is one of the highest honors the AIA can bestow upon a member. This honor not only recognizes the achievements of the architect as an individual, but also elevates before the public and the profession those who have made significant contributions to architecture and to society.

Michael Buono

Michael Buono

“The American Institute of Architects has over 85,000 members, and each year only around 150 AIA members are elected to the Institute’s College of Fellows,” says Dr. Robert Weddle, dean of the Hammons School of Architecture. “This news truly demonstrates Professor Buono’s caliber and dedication as an educator and is emblematic of the quality of the HSA program, which he led for over a decade.”

Buono is only the third AIA member from the southwest Missouri area to be elected an AIA Fellow. The first was Richard P. Stahl, a 1936 Drury graduate and architect of many distinguished buildings, including on the Drury campus. HSA alumnus Andrew Wells ’91 — principal of Dake Wells Architecture in Springfield — was the second.

Buono, AIA, LEED AP, served as Director of the Hammons School of Architecture from 2000 until 2012. Prior to joining Drury, he served as associate dean and also director of the architecture program at the University of Arkansas for 15 years. He has also taught at Texas Tech University, the Georgia Institute of Technology and Mississippi State University. Buono has practiced architecture with firms in Atlanta and Denver, and maintains his own practice. His primary interest is in sustainable design.

For more information about the AIA College of Fellows visit: http://network.aia.org/cof/home.

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Architecture students help envision future of Kitchen Inc. campus

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Feb. 11, 2016 — The Hammons School of Architecture’s Center for Community Studies (CCS) will lead a visioning exercise this weekend that could help define the future of 3.5 acres of land on Commercial Street currently owned by The Kitchen, Inc.

Students and faculty from the CCS will lead a design charrette to help stakeholders envision conceptual ideas for the renewal of the site. This intensive workshop will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 13 at the Savoy Ballroom, 224 E. Commercial St.

The workshop is open to the public. Partners and stakeholders who will be represented include The Kitchen Inc., the Commercial Club, the Landmarks Board, City of Springfield Planning and Development, and the University of Missouri-Extension. This workshop will lead to further study by Drury architecture students, who will present design possibilities to stakeholders in the coming months.

The Missouri Hotel is the anchor of the redevelopment study. The landmark was designed by local architects Heckenlively & Mark, and originally opened as the Greene Tavern Hotel in April 1930. In addition to the Missouri Hotel, there are seven other buildings on the campus property. With The Kitchen Inc.’s decision to sell its Commercial Street properties and relocate, this section of Commercial Street is now on the market. The property extends from Benton to Jefferson along Commercial Street and south along Jefferson Avenue for a block and a half.

“As the east gateway to the Commercial Street area, this complex of buildings and buildable spaces occupies an important location for the C-Street District and the Springfield community,” says Jay Garrott, professor of architecture and director of the CCS. “The redevelopment of this property represents a potential physical, economic and emotional tipping point for C-Street and all of Midtown. Our goal is to help illuminate the possibilities for both the community and for developers.”

Design Charrette Schedule

10 a.m. – Orientation and tour of the Missouri Hotel and Kitchen Inc. campus

11 a.m.-2 p.m. – Charrette teams work on proposals

2 p.m. – Discussion of ideas with reviewers and larger group

About the Center for Community Studies

The Center for Community Studies is the interdisciplinary research and academic outreach component of the Hammons School of Architecture. The mission of the center is to assist the regional community in exploring and promoting innovative planning, design and development practices that respond to the challenges of our contemporary and future society and foster a healthier and sustainable habitat for our global community. The Center has worked with more than 60 communities across the region over the last 15 years. Visioning projects inside the City of Springfield have included the West Central Neighborhood Route 66 corridor and a center city housing study.

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Media Contacts: Jay G. Garrott, Professor of Architecture: (417) 873-7371 or (417) 818-8289; or Jeff Barber, MU Extension: (417) 343-5682.

Solar Decathlon leads to hands-on experience, job offers for students

After 18 months of work, the Solar Decathlon competition has come and gone for the 100-plus students on the Drury University and Crowder College team. Their house, dubbed ShelteR3 or “Shelter Cubed,” won 8th place in the contest sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy in Irvine, California last month.

Reflecting on the experience reveals many tangible takeaways: pride in a job well done, experience on a build site, professional connections – even job offers.

Avery Smith, a Drury business major and member of the ShelteR3 communication team, said finally being at the big competition opened his eyes to how far the team had truly come.

“Each team had such an original idea and original story about how they were able to make it,” Smith said. “140 teams applied, 20 were accepted and only 14 made it to Irvine. Even then, four teams were unable to finish on time.”

Solar Decathletes

Perhaps that was a light way of putting it, as the Crowder-Drury team was one of the few undergraduate teams that made it all the way.

“I was the most surprised to learn how many graduate students and doctoral candidates we were up against,” said Evan Melgren, a 2014 Drury advertising/PR graduate who was the team’s communication lead. “That we as undergrads were competitive with such established designers and engineers became a great source of pride.”

Being undergrads also led to increased pressure for the students who spent days and weeks in Irvine, said mentor and Hammons School of Architecture Professor Nancy Chikaraishi.

“Our students had homework, they had papers, they had tests they had to take and we were running them back to and from the hotel about five times a day and making sure they had time to get their work done,” she said.

The effort was worth it. Not only did the competition help students expand their horizons, but it also got them thinking about the finer points of project management and on-the-spot problem solving.

Project Manager Jarren Welch, a Crowder student, said that while he felt prepared for the competition thanks to the mentorship of his advisors, there were still unexpected bumps in the road.

“When we did get out there, we ran into a couple of problems, so I learned ways to improvise and work around that,” he said. “I learned that there isn’t just one answer to a problem and it’s all about picking the best idea.”

ShelteR3 house

Though they couldn’t have known it going in, experiences with solving problems on the fly ultimately led to job offers. Project co-lead Alaa Al Radwan credits the Decathlon for helping her land a job at M.I.T.’s prestigious Senseable City Lab. Melgren cites his readiness to adapt as the reason he landed his current job at Killian Construction Co.

“They saw a video walk-through of our home and concept, which had required me to learn an architectural software program in about a week,” he says.

Welch’s new job with Missouri Sun Solar also came as a result of stretching beyond his comfort zone. His offer came not from the building phase, but during a fundraiser.

“I handed them my card and they called me a few weeks later and offered me an interview and I got hired,” he said.

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Story by Chaniqua Crook, student writer with Drury’s Marketing & Communication Department.

C-Street Gallery opens “Moon City Lights” exhibition Friday

SPRINGFIELD, MO., Nov. 3, 2015 – The Drury on C-Street Gallery will open its November exhibition “Moon City Lights: Drury Student Architecture + Moon City Creative District” with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m., Friday, Nov. 6.

The featured artists are multiple third-year Drury architecture students under the guidance of studio design professor Maurizio Sabini. The opening reception is a free event that includes food and refreshments as well as entertainment provided by the Drury Jazz Ensemble. The Drury on C-Street Gallery is located on 233 E. Commercial St.

The show reflects the collaboration between Drury’s Hammons School of Architecture and Springfield’s Moon City Creative District, a 10-square-block area in the Woodland Heights neighborhood north of Commercial Street. The area has been designated by the City of Springfield as a live/work district where artists can operate studios in their homes and have a limited retail presence.

Students were tasked with designing about 25 live/work units that embody the Moon City District’s goals of revitalization through the arts and a localized sense of community. The schematic and detailed design work also includes retail space, parking and public spaces. The featured exhibition designs were selected by Professor Sabini through a juried process that included design professionals and representatives from the City of Springfield and the Moon City Creative District.

This scale model allowed the students to test their ideas for further developing the Moon City Creative District.

This scale model allowed the students to test their ideas for further developing the Moon City Creative District.

The exhibition will run Nov. 6 through 21. Gallery viewing hours after the opening reception will be 1 to 5 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on two Saturdays, November 14 and 21.

For more information, call (417) 873-6359 or visit Drury on C-Street’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/DruryCStreet.

About Drury on C-Street

The Drury on C-Street Project is an initiative by Drury University, in partnership with other local organizations, to establish a Drury Center on Commercial Street. This center includes an art gallery, a business resource center, space for weaving looms, architecture classroom and a multi-use area for additional classes and seminars. The Drury on C-Street Gallery is a professional, student-run gallery featuring emerging and established artists. Drury University’s Drury on C-Street Gallery provides arts administration majors the experience of promoting the work of local artists. The gallery connects the community to new and relevant art in an accessible and welcoming environment.

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Drury Architecture professor to speak at Crystal Bridges Museum of Art

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Nov. 2, 2015 — A Drury University professor will give a lecture that draws on both personal and professional experiences at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, this week.

Hammons School of Architecture professor Nancy Chikaraishi’s lecture will look at the process and shared boundaries of creating space in art and architecture. It will include work from her previously released exhibit “Life Interrupted,” a collection of drawings and paintings portraying her parents’ stories from their time in a Japanese Internment camp in Rohwer, Arkansas, during World War II. The presentation is at 7 p.m. on Nov. 4 and will include several new pieces created by Chikaraishi that were inspired by the CORE Performance Company.

Nancy Chikaraishi

Nancy Chikaraishi

Chikaraishi worked as a visual artist with CORE Performance Company on “Gaman,” a dance/theatrical performance that explores how challenges can be overcome by courage; and expresses the conflicting emotions of sorrow and joy, confinement and liberation experienced by the interned Japanese-American citizens. A public performance of “Gaman” will be held at the University of Central Arkansas on Nov. 9 and at Crystal Bridges on Nov. 11.

“Hopefully, we can shed light on these kinds of events and prevent them from happening again,” Chikaraishi said. “A lot of people still don’t know that there were camps in Arkansas. I think it’s very important that we understand our history when it comes to issues of race and discrimination.”

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