Breech Business Week helps prepare students for the professional world

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., April 13, 2016 — The Breech School of Business Administration at Drury University will dedicate next week to showcasing the strength of its student body and its ties with the business community in Springfield and beyond.

Breech Business Week, now in its third year, serves as another way of ensuring Breech students are “job ready” by connecting them with the professional world beyond campus. In addition to networking opportunities and workshops on topics such as negotiating job offers and polishing their online presence, students will interact with a number of business professionals. The guest lecturers include Esther George, president of the Kansas City Federal Reserve, and Matt Morrow, president of the Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce.

Drury students will receive valuable insights and feedback from these professional connections, while business leaders learn what makes Drury graduates such highly valued colleagues in the workforce.

“A Drury business education has always been designed to take learning beyond the classroom,” says Dr. Robin Sronce, dean of the Breech School. “Breech Business Week embodies that idea. Seeing the interactions between students, alumni, professionals and guest lecturers has become a highlight of the academic year at Breech.”

Selected events from each day, which are open to the media, include:

Monday, April 18, 10 a.m. – Teleconference discussion with Esther George, President and CEO of Kansas City Federal Reserve

Tuesday, April 19, Noon – Polish your Online Image: Online presence review with the Career Planning and Development Office

Wednesday, April 20, 6 p.m. – Work/Life Balance: A discussion with Mary Jane Norris of Elliott, Robinson & Co.

Thursday, April 21, 12 p.m. – Discussion with Springfield Chamber of Commerce President Matt Morrow and Board Chair Debbie Shantz Hart. 1:30 p.m. – Negotiating Job Offers: Discussion with Karen Shannon, Human Resources & Business Consulting Director at Ollis/Akers/Arney.

Friday, April 24, 12 p.m. – The Breech Award Luncheon honoring the top students in Drury’s business school will be held at the O’Reilly Family Event Center. Note to editors: This is an excellent opportunity to interview seniors who are about to enter the workforce, including those who already have jobs lined up and those who are currently seeking jobs.

A full schedule of the week’s events can be found online. Breech Business Week is presented by the Breech Advisory Board, and made possible by corporate partner CoxHealth and corporate sponsors Commerce Bank and OakStar Bank.

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Media Contact: Dr. Robin Sronce, Dean, Breech School of Business: (417) 873-7438 or rsronce@drury.edu.

Getting to Know Drury’s 18th President: Part 1 – The Selection Process

Part One: The View from the Search Committee

In an effort to better get to know Dr. J. Timothy Cloyd following a confidential search process, we asked several members of the search committee to discuss how and why they chose the school’s next leader. We will hear directly from Dr. Cloyd himself in future installments.

How did Dr. Cloyd come to the search team’s attention?

Lyle Reed, Chair, Board of Trustess: I was speaking with my good friend Dr. Robert Wyatt, President of Coker College and former director of Drury’s Breech School of Business Administration and asked him if he could think of any candidates he would recommend. He highly recommended Dr. Tim Cloyd, who had been president of Hendrix College when Robert was an ACE Fellow (mentoring and training individuals to be higher education senior leaders) assigned to Hendrix.  He indicated Tim had returned to the classroom, but might now be interested in returning to leadership and would check with him.  He then told me Dr. Cloyd was interested and gave me his contact information. We set up a meeting in Conway and he subsequently applied to be a candidate for the presidency.

What was your first impression of Dr. Cloyd?

Reed: I think many of us were looking for a charismatic individual, with a broadcaster’s voice, right out of Central Casting, who would quiet a room as soon as he walked in. That is not Dr. Cloyd. He is soft spoken, and doesn’t desire to take over a room.

Second impression?

Reed: His thoughtful and strategic mind quickly becomes captivating on any subject, especially higher education as it relates to yesterday, today and tomorrow.  His extensive background and experience provides plenty of substance for those discussions.

So, why did you choose him?

Bill Hart, Board of Trustees: Our search committee, with survey input from faculty, staff and alumni, compiled a list of specific criteria our new president must have. Dr. Cloyd easily met all the criteria. Additionally, and to me most importantly, Dr. Cloyd did for Hendrix what we’re hoping to do here at Drury. I believe he will assimilate all the strengths and wonderful attributes of Drury in a new vision of the University, which will be compelling and attractive to today’s students.

What excites you most about him?

Penny Clayton, faculty member: Dr. Cloyd is clearly a visionary leader and impressive intellectual. He has become quickly familiar with Drury’s background and is looking forward to providing fresh solutions to ongoing struggles. He has already developed a strong desire to get to know the Drury community and during interviews, spoke of the importance of exercising emotional intelligence.

Hart: Dr. Cloyd has such an incredible breadth and depth to his background, education and life experiences. I believe he demonstrates a quiet, but successful, analytical approach to problems and issues which will appeal to everyone at Drury: students, faculty, alumni and the Board.

How extensive was the vetting process?

Reed: It was as extensive as possible without hiring a gumshoe to shadow him and interrogate his acquaintances back to childhood. It included multiple face-to-face interviews with committee members, numerous telephone conversations, a volume of emails, Internet searches, and extensive reference and public records checking by our professional search firm. The search firm conducted a comprehensive interview with him. And our search committee received his medical reports and had background conversations with other confidential sources.

What did you learn from vetting that you didn’t know from his CV?

Reed: We learned more about his personal life, especially his family.  He was divorced some seven years ago from the mother of his children – Thomas, 16, and Samuel, 18. He is remarried and his wife, Wendy, has a son from a previous marriage, Logan, who is attending college in New Zealand. She lived in New Zealand for several years after running the family business in Nashville. Wendy and Tim were neighbors and classmates in high school and were reacquainted at a class reunion.

Were there any surprising moments during the process?

Reed: No, but there were some very candid discussions about serious topics, including one in particular about an incident that significantly impacted his family. On Christmas evening 2012, Dr. Cloyd hosted some international students at his home. That event had ended and he, his wife and sons were having family Christmas time together which included exchanging gifts, relaxing together, and he had a drink. Around midnight, an armed fugitive forced his way into their home and overtly threatened Dr. Cloyd’s family with harm if they didn’t do as told. He was in another room and heard the commotion, retrieved his personal handgun for which he is trained and holds a permit, and proceeded to hold the intruder at bay until the police arrived. Fortunately, the police arrived fairly quickly. Numerous police officers entered the residence while the person was still at large in the house. There was a considerable struggle and force was required to restrain the intruder, who was on drugs. He recalled it for us as a very frightening, chaotic scene, and a traumatic situation for his family, who witnessed everything first hand. It was clear to us that he did exactly what he believed he needed to do to protect his family in that difficult situation, and the good news was that none of his family was harmed, nor did he have to harm the intruder. It was a horrifying experience for the Cloyd family that required them to receive subsequent victim counseling. It is hard to be prepared for emergencies where you only have adrenaline-filled seconds to react.

Hart: I was an FBI agent for four years before entering a legal practice. After hearing the facts about the entire incident, I could understand why this event was so impactful. No one can imagine or anticipate how fast something like that happens and how disorienting, confusing and terrifying the situation can be. Law enforcement trains for that type of incident and still, you never know how you will react until it happens. In training, you talk about the incident after it’s over and invariably someone says they wish they had done something a little differently. It is never the same next time, there is always some circumstance that changes. This is certainly the kind of situation no one wants to go through.

What path led Dr. Cloyd to Drury?

Reed: Well, he had resigned as president of Hendrix about three years ago. The committee wanted to know why such a successful president would step down and return to the classroom. Those decision processes are not often a straight line and usually have multiple influences.  He had been thinking about stepping down for a year or so. He had twelve years of major happenings at Hendrix, including weathering two major recessions and had just completed a successful comprehensive capital campaign. Presidencies are demanding of personal time. Tim believes that presidents often have a “shelf life” at a particular institution and new thinking is needed to keep strategies fresh and relevant. And, while it was not a primary driver, the invasion incident was a life-changing experience for him and his family and influenced their personal priorities. I think all of those things combined to cause him to take a timeout. And, his timeout came to an end at the same time we began our search.

What is the one thing you want the Drury community to know about Dr. Cloyd?

Hart: I believe he is a really quick study. We shouldn’t be surprised if he has discovered a lot more about the issues facing Drury and today’s liberal arts education by July 1 than any of us expect. I suspect he will have many ideas about how to move Drury forward sooner than we anticipate and he will be right.

Clayton: He will be active in the Drury and Springfield communities and is dedicated to ensuring Drury’s future as a prestigious liberal arts university. I believe he will thoughtfully assess the current Drury climate, yet move quickly in developing momentum for a successful Drury future.

Reed: He is an empirical decision-maker and action-oriented. Traits that all references shared were: he is a strategic thinker, idea generator, entrepreneur, risk taker, visionary and efficacious leader. Our committee asked Dr. Cloyd: Of those traits, which one he would most embrace?  His answer: he is an “idea person.”  But, I believe they all speak to who Tim Cloyd is. I have personally spent a lot of time with Dr. Cloyd since the search team voted unanimously to recommend him to the full board of trustees as Drury’s 18th president, and I am now even more convinced that Tim Cloyd is the right person to lead Drury into the future we all desire.

Read Part 2 of the Q&A Series: The Formative Years.

Q&A: How the Northwest Project will benefit Springfield & Drury

The Community Foundation of the Ozarks announced Tuesday that a five-year grant for up to $1.3 million to address poverty in northwest Springfield will be awarded to a partnership led by Drury University, Missouri State University, and the Drew Lewis Foundation. The goal of The Northwest Project is to pilot strategies over a five-year period to help families overcome the challenges that have kept them living in poverty and sustain their long-term success in emerging from those circumstances.

Drury faculty and staff are excited by the possibilities for truly meaningful community engagement in the coming years. We asked Dan Prater, executive director of Drury’s Center for Nonproft Leadership, and Ryan Gipson, director of Drury’s Office of Community Outreach and Leadership Development, to tell us more about DU’s role in this major initiative.

 

What is the Northwest Project in a nutshell?

Dan Prater: It’s a large-scale effort to move people out of poverty and into a stronger, more sustainable life. This is in response to decades of seeing groups working on poverty, but with very little change in the poverty rate in our region.

The CFO put out requests for proposals from local organizations that worked collectively to create a systematic process for assisting families. The MSU/Fairbanks/Drury alliance was the winning group. This project differs from previous efforts in that all participating agencies will be required to work in unison with other helping agencies, using consistent forms, and communicating with one another.

The Northwest Project is modeled after a program in Jacksonville, Florida called “1,000 in 1,000.” That project was a collective effort of area nonprofits and civic organizations that moved 1,000 people out of poverty in 1,000 days.

What role will Drury and the Center for Nonprofit Leadership play in the project?

Prater: The Center for Nonprofit Leadership will work side-by-side with Missouri State University’s Center for Community Engagement to provide all evaluation and assessment for the project.

The Drury CNL and MSU CEC team will conduct quantitative and qualitative analysis, providing to funders and participating agencies important information on the families’ progress or lack thereof. This will help explain the factors that caused some individuals/families to succeed, and what caused some to fail. This critical information will help shape future program delivery, giving nonprofit and civic leaders primary evidence regarding their services.

How will the community benefit from Drury’s involvement?

Ryan Gipson: Drury will also be using new community service tracking and marketing software as part of this grant. This will allow us to direct Drury students, faculty, and staff to service opportunities being held by the agencies involved in the grant. But the truly exciting part is that it will also allow us to market those opportunities to the Springfield community as a whole. Anyone in Springfield can log onto the general website, see any service opportunities available, and RSVP to volunteer.

We want to see this tool used across the entire Springfield community so that nonprofit agencies in the area can reach more people who want to volunteer.

What kinds of opportunities will Drury students have to be involved in the project?

Gipson: During the next five years, we will be directing nearly one-third of the service hours that students log through the Community Outreach and Leadership Development Office to nonprofit agencies that are participating in the Northwest Project grant. The grant also allows us to increase our VITA Tax Clinic capacity to help more families.

Anytime agencies have a need for volunteers, we will ensure it is marketed to Drury students. The Community Outreach and Leadership Development office will also plan special large-scale events with focuses in the Northwest area. We will encourage students to use the skills they’ve gained in the classroom to help in specialized areas of need such as architecture students assisting with the Habitat for Humanity projects that are part of the grant, to name just one possible example.

What are your hopes for the impact the project will have on our community? 

Prater: We hope this project will have a clear, lasting impact on people in poverty. By providing people with the tools and resources they need, we hope to see immediate and long-term outcomes. Helping people with immediate needs can help them prepare for the future. The ripple effect will be felt by their entire family, and possibly for generations to come.

Drury among partners selected for $1.3 million Northwest Project grant

The Community Foundation of the Ozarks announced today that a five-year grant for up to $1.3 million to address poverty in northwest Springfield will be awarded to a partnership led by Missouri State University, the Drew Lewis Foundation and Drury University.

The partnership was selected by a volunteer grant committee through a competitive process that began last fall. Major funding for the grant is being provided by the CFO, the Stanley and Elaine Ball Foundation managed by Central Trust and The Musgrave Foundation.

The goal of The Northwest Project is to pilot strategies over a five-year period to help families overcome the challenges that have kept them living in poverty and sustain their long-term success in emerging from those circumstances. The MSU/Drew Lewis/Drury partnership was selected for its vision of using a model that couples family support with neighborhood development and sustainability. This community-driven development model will work to bridge the gaps between people and resources through both case management services and a teamwork approach where program participants will be expected to support each other.

A strong consideration in awarding the grant is the proposed comprehensive evaluation process, which will be coordinated jointly by MSU’s Center for Community Engagement and Drury’s Center for Nonprofit Leadership. In addition, Drury’s Community Outreach and Leadership Development Office will manage a centralized, online volunteer service to coordinate participant needs and reduce overlap of services.

The CFO encouraged grant applicants to consider a model used in Jacksonville, Florida’s “1,000 in 1,000” project, which has demonstrated success in reducing poverty by emphasizing “pivotal assets” that boost families’ opportunities for success. Examples of these include financial literacy, parenting skills, reliable transportation, affordable housing, quality childcare and others.

The MSU/Drew Lewis/Drury partnership also includes a number of community agencies that will provide resources related to these pivotal assets. These partners are: Ozarks Technical Community College, MU Extension, the City of Springfield, Consumer Credit Counseling, Springfield Community Gardens, Springfield Public Schools, Life 360 Family Services, Habitat for Humanity, Boys and Girls Club, Great Circle-Parenting Life Skills Center, Hand in Hand Multicultural Center, Care to Learn, Springfield Metropolitan Bar Association, Ozarks Regional YMCA and Schweitzer United Methodist Church Jobs for Life Program.

The first step for The Northwest Project will be informational meetings this spring to recruit and evaluate the first group of eligible families. For more information about the background of The Northwest Project, visit: www.cfozarks.org/northwest.

Sugar Rush event to benefit Harmony House and Watching over Whiskers

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., April 4, 2016 — Drury University’s Sigma Pi chapter, along with The Cake Pop Company, are proud to announce the return of Sugar Rush, a dessert sampling charity event. Sugar Rush will be held from 6 to 8:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 14, at the O’Reilly Family Event Center at Drury University.

All proceeds will benefit Harmony House, one of the state’s largest shelters and resource centers for domestic violence victims and their families, and Watching Over Whiskers, a local animal rescue and support fund.

Guests will sample tasty treats from some of the best in the Ozarks including Aviary Cafe, Blue Bell Creameries, Brick & Mortar Coffee, Cake Pop Co., Chick-Fil-A, Daylight Donuts, Golden Corral, Grammy K’s Sweet Creations, Heroes Coffee, June’s Cakery, Kilwins Branson, Neighbor’s Mill Bakery & Cafe, Simply Delicious Catering, Tea Bar & Bites, and Uncommon Confections.

Sugar Rush was held in 2010 and 2011 but was left without a hosting committee until Drury Sigma Pi members stepped in to resurrect the concept earlier this year. “Witnessing the enormous impact Sugar Rush has had in the past for both the businesses and nonprofits involved, we’ve spent the last few months reinventing the original idea while finding opportunities to innovate in an effort to create the best experience possible,” says Kent Otto, Drury’s Sigma Pi chapter director.

Student organizers have “been able to gain invaluable real-world experience by organizing an event of this magnitude,” says student Elias Jardell.

General admission tickets are $15 if purchased in advance at sgfSugarRush.com and $20 at the door. Student tickets are $10 and kids 8 and under are free.

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Media Contact: Kent Otto, Drury Sigma Pi Chapter Director: (417) 459-6589 or kent@sgfsugarrush.com.

C-Street Gallery opens Crafting Our Well-Being: Art as Therapy on April 8

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., April 1, 2016 — The Drury on C-Street Gallery will host an opening reception for its April exhibition, Crafting Our Well-being: Art as Therapy, from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, April 8.

The exhibit features works from retirement community members and more than 10 local artists that illustrate how art is used as cognitive and emotional therapy. The event is free and open to the public. Food and refreshments will be provided as well as live musical entertainment from singer Micah Textor and Drury’s ukulele club, DUkes. There will also be a raffle to win a piece of featured art. Proceeds from the raffle will be donated to the Alzheimer’s Association.

The show is composed of a wide range of media including paintings, ceramics, photography, fiber arts, live performance art, and more. It features work from Rebecca Miller, the director of the arts administration program at Drury, and Jessie Schwartz from Studio 13 in addition to numerous other artists. Weaver Paula Rosen and ceramist David Cogorno will create works live at the opening reception.

Crafting Our Well-being: Art as Therapy runs April 8 through April 28. The gallery is open from 1 to 5 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays, and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays. The Drury on C-Street Gallery is located on 233 E. Commercial St.

For more information, call (417) 873-6359 or visit Drury on C-Street’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/DruryCStreet.

About Drury on C-Street

The Drury on C-Street Project is an initiative by Drury University, in partnership with other local organizations, to establish a Drury Center on Commercial Street. This center includes an art gallery, a business resource center, space for weaving looms, architecture classroom and a multi-use area for additional classes and seminars. The Drury on C-Street Gallery is a professional, student-run gallery featuring emerging and established artists. Drury University’s Drury on C-Street Gallery provides arts administration majors the experience of promoting the work of local artists. The gallery connects the community to new and relevant art in an accessible and welcoming environment.

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International Food Festival celebrates cultures, friendships on campus

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., March 31, 2016 — International students at Drury University will share their cultures with friends and guests through food and performance during the 29th annual International Food Festival at 6 p.m., Saturday, April 2 at the Commons in Findlay Student Center.

This year’s theme is the 2016 Olympics and will include a flag parade, singing, dancing, and other performances. Media are welcome to cover the event.

This popular dinner is truly a university-wide celebration, with numerous faculty, staff and American students joining their international friends each year. With approximately 12 percent of the undergraduate student population hailing from abroad, international culture is an important aspect of everyday life at Drury. These students bring a rich diversity of backgrounds and perspectives to campus, further enhancing a focus on global learning at a university where about half all undergraduates study abroad during their academic career.

Food is an important medium for sharing cultures because, “every culture uses food as a part of their celebrations,” says Heejung Cromley, director of international support services. The festival will feature foods from Kenya, Korea, Italy, India, Brazil, and other countries.

The guests enjoying the food are not the only ones who get a meaningful experience. Students put in a lot of effort to prepare the food and it is often a daylong process. “They work so hard as a team and build friendships through this event,” says Cromley. This event is a way for international students to enjoy spending time with one another and share their culture with the community.

“It is such a wonderful opportunity for our international students to share who they are by introducing their culture through food and sharing,” says Cromley.

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Guest lecturer brings music & marketing expertise to Drury March 31

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., March 29, 2016 — The Self-Employment in the Arts Lecture Series, sponsored by the Edward Jones Center for Entrepreneurship, will bring world-renowned opera singer Michael Spyres to campus for a lecture at 4 p.m. Thursday, March 31 at Carole Lambert Studio in Shewmaker Hall. The talk is open to the public.

Spyres was recently named artistic director of the Springfield Regional Opera. Born and raised in the Ozarks, he is one of the most sought after tenors of his generation and has performed extensively throughout Europe and North America.

During his talk, Spyres will share the story behind his success as a self-employed singer in a dizzyingly competitive industry. The event comes just before he leads the SRO in performances of Mozart’s classic comic opera “The Marriage of Figaro” on April 1 and 3 at the Gillioz Theater.

About the Series and the Edward Jones Center

The Self-Employment in the Arts Series features successful, entrepreneurial artists from across the country for small-group sessions, lectures and the occasional performance on Drury’s campus. The series will bring Drury alumnus and professional opera singer Michael Spyres to campus on Thursday, March 31.

The Edward Jones Center for Entrepreneurship was made possible by the generous contribution of John and Crystal Beuerlein and Edward Jones, Inc. All parties feel passionately about entrepreneurship and believe in the idea of helping people create new businesses. They are also eager to provide employees of existing corporations with tools to continually refresh and reinvent their organizations as markets and business environments change.

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Willie Nelson concert changes lineup; adds Jamey Johnson & Ryan Bingham

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., Mar 29, 2016 — The Willie Nelson & Family concert with Merle Haggard announces a change in the lineup of their April 8 date in Springfield at the O’Reilly Family Event Center.

The following statement was released today by the tour:

Nashville, Tenn., (MARCH 29, 2016) – Due to unforeseen circumstances, Merle Haggard is canceling his April performances with Willie Nelson & Family. He has received doctor’s orders to complete his recovery from double pneumonia by continuing to rest.

Merle says, “I want to thank my fans for their prayers and well wishes. I hope to be back on the road in May, but I’m taking it one day at a time.”

The Willie Nelson & Family tour will continue with special guests Jamey Johnson and Ryan Bingham.

The change in the lineup is bittersweet, as concert promoters were looking forward to seeing the two classic country stars share the stage, but the addition of not one, but two award-winning artists make this evening something unexpectedly special.

This Springfield date is sold out. Ticketholders desiring refunds as a result of the change can call 1-800-514-3849. Any ticket inventory that is refunded will then be made available for purchase at 1o a.m., Friday, April 1. To purchase those tickets, visit www.drurytickets.com, call (417) 873-6389, or visit the box office at the O’Reilly Center.

Willie Nelson & Family with special guests Jamey Johnson & Ryan Bingham will take place on Friday, April 8 at the O’Reilly Family Event Center.

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Humanities & Arts Film Series returns to the Moxie Cinema in April 

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., March 29, 2016 — Drury University’s Humanities & Ethics Center continues its partnership with the Moxie Cinema in downtown Springfield with three upcoming screenings. Drury professors will host the screenings and lead discussions about the films. The Drury Humanities & Arts Film Series is made possible by a grant from the Missouri Humanities Council.

The spring series begins on Saturday, April 2 at 1 p.m. with the film, Chinatown. Dr. Kevin Henderson, assistant dean of the humanities and social sciences, will host the screening by giving a short talk and leading a discussion with the audience. The themes will include the film’s now iconic status, the questions it poses for the humanities, and the lingering power of film noir in American culture. Thanks to the grant from the Missouri Humanities Council, tickets are half-price ($5).

Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway star in Chinatown.

Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway star in Chinatown.

Next in the series is the film The Iron Giant, hosted by Steve Carpenter, assistant professor of art/communication, which will screen on Saturday, April 16 at 1 p.m. Tickets will be free for this showing.

The third and final film is Burnt By the Sun, hosted by Dr. Ray Patton, assistant professor of history. This film will screen on Saturday, April 30 at 1 p.m. Tickets for this event will be half-price ($5).

The Moxie is the region’s only independently owned arts cinema and is located at 305 S. Campbell Ave. Parking in the adjacent parking garage is free of charge.

For more information about these films or this series, which is part of Drury’s Humanities and Ethics Center series, visit Drury’s Humanities blog Human, All Too Human, or www.moxiecinema.com.

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Media Contact: Kevin Henderson; Director, Humanities and Arts Film Series: (417) 873-7426 or khenders@drury.edu.